"Gombo zhèbes.": Little dictionary of Creole proverbs, selected from six Creole dialects. Tr. into French and into English, with notes, complete index to subjects and some brief remarks upon the Creole idioms of Lousiana (Google eBook)

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Will H. Coleman, 1885 - Proverbs, Creole - 42 pages
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Page 3 - ... ethnologists to science will be also discovered some remarkable observations upon the actual formation of various patois— strongly resembling our own Creole— in the French African colonies. *** Needless to say this collection is far from perfect;— the most I can hope for is that it may constitute the nucleus of a more exhaustive publication to appear in course of time. No one person could hope to make a really complete collection of Creole proverbs — even with all the advantages of linguistic...
Page 16 - Tell me if thou hast a man (a lover) I will make a ouanga for him — I will change him into a ghost if thou wilt have me for thy husband.
Page 1 - Any one who has ever paid a flying visit to New Orleans probably knows something about those various culinary preparations whose generic name is "Gombo...
Page 3 - ... for is that it may constitute the nucleus of a more exhaustive publication to appear in course of time. No one person could hope to make a really complete collection of Creole proverbs — even with all the advantages of linguistic knowledge, leisure, wealth, and travel. Only a society of folklorists might bring such an undertaking to a successful issue; — but as no systematic effort is being made in this direction, I have had no hesitation in attempting — not indeed to fill a want — but...
Page 17 - ... aber Ndumbe hat ihn nachher getotet. Bailey (1721), 25. Save a thief from hanging, and he'll cut your throat. Chieviot, 70. Buy a thief frae the middle and he'll help to hang ye. Save a thief from the gallows and he'll be the first to show thee the way to St. Giles. 495. Hearn, 112 (Lousiana). If you spit in the air, it will fall back on your own nose. Speirs. Spit a de sky, he sa fall a you
Page 1 - Creole"; they call it gombo, for some mysterious reason which I have never been able to explain satisfactorily. The colored Creoles of the city have themselves begun to use the term to characterize the patois spoken by the survivors of slavery days. Turiault tells us that in the towns of Martinique, where the Creole is gradually changing into French, the Bitacos, or country Negroes who still speak the patois nearly pure, are much ridiculed by their municipal brethren: — fa ou ka palt Id, che, c'est...
Page 20 - O'Rahilly, 195. One cannot bark and run at the same time; One cannot eat and whistle, etc. 570. Hearn, 142 (Trinidad). Folks who advise you to buy a big-bellied horse in a rainy season, won't help you to feed him in a dry season when grass is scarce. Speirs, 547. Man buy big belly haas, he wan ha' fo
Page 7 - ... all the world hears ; not parrot, she chats too much for the world to hear; but what woodpeceker has to say he tells to the tree," hence "what he say in him belly hard fe answer." Cf. 828. 862. Wha' you don't know older dan you. "What you don't know is older than you are." 856. Hearn, 4 (Martinique). Before the Indian tree bore seed, the monkeys were able to nourish their young.
Page 25 - The young cock crows like the old one." Cf. 926, 961. 226. Dead better dan punish. R, C 157 "Death is better than suffering"; applied to a sick man whose suffering is looked upon as a "punishment" inflicted by a spirit in revenge for past injuries. 219. 'Hearn, 201 (Trinidad). The same stick that beats the black dog can beat the white. Storbeck, 117. Was eingeht in den Ziegenstall, kann auch eingehen in den Schafstall. Speirs, 219. Wha' happen to black fowl sa happen to white fowl.
Page 14 - Win' blow mo'tah, wha' you t'ink a sifta? 414. Hearn, 80 (Trinidad). It's when the wind is blowing that folks can see the skin of a fowl. Speirs, 491. If win' no blow, you no see fowl back.

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