Diary of a Newlywed Poet (Google eBook)

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Susquehanna University Press, 2004 - Biography & Autobiography - 499 pages
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This is the first translation into English of the complete "Diary, written by Nobel Laureate Juan Ramon Jimenez. The translation strives at all times for accuracy and fidelity to the original text, while seeking a graceful idiom in English, expressive of the subtle nuances and rhythms of both the poetic prose and free verse. The text itself is well annotated, attentive particularly to the special needs for explanation or clarification for a non-specialist in Spanish literature. The introduction provides the reader with essential information on the life and works of the poet, his indebtedness to the Romantic and Symbolist heritage in modern European poetry, and his contact with and evaluation of North American poetry. The introduction also provides an analysis and interpretation of the central theme and key recurring patterns of imagery and symbolism that result in a dramatic and profound revelation of the human psyche.
  

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Contents

Acknowledgments
13
Introduction to the Life and Works of Juan Ramón Jiménez
21
Qué peso aquí en el corazón inquieto What heaviness here
46
How close to the soul
91
Dreaming
97
First almond tree in flower
103
Moguer
107
Afternoon at nowhere
109
The sky?
295
Seascape in a Bedroom
297
Night in Huntington
299
Elegy
303
Here she is now
305
An Afternoon in Spring
307
We have been in it
311
Cemeteries
313

To a woman
111
Fitful Sleep
112
You and Seville
115
Dos Hermanas
117
The regular afternoon train
119
To an Andalusian girl
121
Puerto Real
123
The terrible menace
125
As slender as your arms maybe
129
Solitude
131
Monotony
133
Venus
135
Awakening
137
Stars
139
Sky
141
Nocturne
143
Skies
145
Sun in the Stateroom
147
Less
151
Sea
153
Disagreeable Sensations
155
Sky
157
Boredom
159
in my anguished heart
160
Natures Festival
163
ArgamasillaonSea
165
Do you not see the sea?
167
The Storms End
169
Flawless Arrival
171
You have changed the rose
175
I stripped your petals
181
The Gulf
183
Sky
185
Rubén Darío
187
Physical Culture
191
In the darkness we imbibed
193
Urban Tunnel
195
Cradle Song
196
Exquisiteness
199
From Boston to New York
201
A Dream on the Train
207
Thorn
209
New Sky
211
Yes You are with me oh
213
Your images were
215
Everything prepared now
217
Smoke and Gold
219
Cemetery
221
The Little Prussian
223
Silence
225
In the ring
227
The Black Girl and the Rose
229
Ideal Epitaph
231
With you asleep
233
Cemetery on Broadway
235
April so tender
237
What anguish
239
Springtime
241
Palm Sunday
243
Storm
245
Then you left
247
Springtime?
249
? 249 109 El árbol tranquilo The Peaceful Tree
251
Vigilance
253
The Moon
255
Springtime
257
Garcilaso in New York
259
Oasis
261
Long Live Spring
263
Song
265
Late Night
267
Spiritual Serenade
269
Yes They learn from our dream
273
Prolongation of the Landscape
275
A Spring Day in New Jersey
277
Epitaph
283
The Mauve Butterfly
285
The Pon
287
A Spring Afternoon
289
I feel azure blue
291
Nocturne
293
Nocturne
315
Rectification with the Sun
317
Remorse
319
To Miranda in the Stadium
321
Dawning
325
Portrait of a Boy
327
A Days Absence
329
The Morality of Love
331
Eve
333
Port
335
Remorse
337
Departure without Goodbyes
339
Nostalgia
343
Nude
345
Sea
347
The Sea
349
Oh sea rebel sky
351
The sea is on target
353
Today you are you
355
Now one has only to think
359
Convexities
361
Nocturne
363
Sleepless Sea
365
The white moon
367
Departure
369
A Day in the Azores
373
The Three of Us
377
Across the Atlantis sky
379
Afternoon Rainbow
381
Afternoon Nocturne
383
Daybreak
385
My Own Gold
387
Nocturne
389
Noonday
391
Life
393
? 395 187 Nocturno Nocturne
397
Child in the Sea
399
Blind
401
I do not know if today the sea is
403
Everything
405
Finally
407
Iberia
409
The Last Night
411
Finally
413
Parting at Morning
415
Inside
417
Cádiz
421
Early Morning Coolness
423
Nighttime Square
425
From Cádiz to Seville
427
Carnations
429
Semper
431
Mother 208 Niebla roja en el verde aún oscuro Niebla redness in the still dark green
432
How well its first nest
435
The Canonical Choir
437
Goodbye
439
Dawning
441
This very sea?
443
Elegy
445
Memories of Eastern United States Written in Spain
446
From Emily Dickinson
449
National Arts Club
451
Boston on Sunday
453
The Sky?
455
Colony Club
457
Section
459
Ex Mrs Watts
461
Streetcar
463
Authors Club
465
Lovely Long Island
466
Walt Whitman
469
I cant go on
471
The Aging Coquettes
473
Washington from its Obelisk
477
Broad Street
479
An Imitator of Billy Sunday
481
Poes House
487
Wrong Time
488
Purple Windows
491
Poets note
493
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

On receiving the Nobel Prize in 1956, Juan Ramon Jimenez was praised for "his lyrical poetry, which constitutes an inspiring example in the Spanish language of spirituality and artistic purity." Jimenez's works have indeed provided inspiration for many younger Spanish poets--- Federico Garcia Lorca, Pedro Salinas, and Jorge Guillen among them---as well as for Latin American poets. His poetic world is both aesthetic and spiritual. Through poetry Jimenez endeavored not only to express his interior reality but also to reach the highest levels of spiritual experience. Jimenez's early work is marked by a short period of modernism followed by a rejection of it in favor of simpler forms, particularly that of traditional Spanish ballads. The turmoil and anxiety produced by his sea voyage to the United States to marry an American, Zenobia Camprubi, and their return as newlyweds began his second period. That phase was characterized by increasing subjectivity and purification of his poetry, a process furthered by Zenobia, who protected him from intrusions of the world. His use of women to symbolize the objects of his desires to know and experience reveals the influence of Gustavo Adolfo Becquer. In his final stage, he embarked on a mystical search for the absolute. His revelation was that "God desired" and "God desiring" reside within his own soul. Platero and I (1914), a poignant and charming story in poetic prose about a silver-gray donkey named Platero, is popular with children. Jimenez did not intend it for children exclusively, however, but rather as a celebration of the essence of the child, "a spiritual island fallen from heaven.

Bibliographic information