Euphranor, a dialogue on youth [by E. Fitzgerald]. (Google eBook)

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Page 29 - Lets in new light through chinks that Time has made: Stronger by weakness, wiser men become As they draw near to their eternal home. Leaving the old, both worlds at once they view That stand upon the threshold of the new.
Page 18 - Even when the hoary head is hid in snow, The life is in the Leaf, and still between The fits of falling snow appears the streaky green.
Page 63 - Embrouded was he, as it were a mede Al ful of fresshe floures, whyte and rede. 90 Singinge he was, or floytinge, al the day ; He was as fresh as is the month of May.
Page 11 - Chivalry is only a name for that general Spirit or state of mind, which disposes men to Heroic and Generous actions; and keeps them conversant with all that is Beautiful and Sublime in the Intellectual and Moral world.
Page 81 - Trinity!" the high crest and blowing forelock of Phidippus's mare, and he himself shouting encouragement to his crew, conspicuous over all, until the boats reaching us, we also were caught up in the returning tide of spectators, and hurried back toward the goal; where we arrived just in time to see the Ensign of Trinity lowered from its pride of place, and the Eagle of St. John's soaring there instead. Then, waiting a little while...
Page 81 - Go it, Trinity!" the high crest and blowing forelock of Phidippus's mare, and he himself shouting encouragement to his crew, conspicuous over all, until the boats reaching us, we also were caught up in the returning tide of spectators, and hurried back toward the...
Page 80 - Fellow-commoner sprinkled here and there Reading men and Sporting men Fellows, and even Masters of Colleges, not indifferent to the prowess of their respective Crews all these, conversing on all sorts of topics, from the slang in...
Page 65 - how the fresh air of the Kent hills, over which he rode four hundred years ago, breathes in his verses still. They have a perfume like fine old hay, that will not lose its sweetness, having been cut and carried so fresh. All his poetry bespeaks a man of sound mind and body.
Page 65 - The verses Euphranor could not remember are these : * " For Chaucer that my master was, and knew What did belong to writing verse and prose, Ne'er stumbled at small faults, nor yet did view With scornful eyes the works and books of those That in his time did write, nor yet would taunt At any man, to fear him or to daunt.
Page 15 - Utility, and therefore not their friends; and they chiefly err in doing all things over much, for they keep no medium. They love much, and they dislike much, and so in everything, and this arises from their idea that they know everything. And their faults consist more in Insolence than in actual wrong; and they are full of Mercy, because they regard all men as good, and 14 EUPHRANOR. more virtuous than they are; for they measure others by their own Innocence; so that they suppose every man suffers...

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