The Tragedy of Pudd'nhead Wilson (Google eBook)

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Digireads.com Publishing, Jan 1, 2005 - Fiction - 96 pages
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"The Tragedy of Pudd'nhead Wilson" begins with the act of a young slave girl exchanging her light-skinned child, fearing for its safety, for that of her master's. From this reversal of identities evolves a suspenseful murder mystery and courtroom drama. "The Tragedy of Pudd'nhead Wilson" is everything one would expect from a novel by Mark Twain. On the surface it is a witty and satirical tale but as one digs deeper a biting social commentary of racial inequality can be found.
  

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Contents

CHAPTER 1
4
CHAPTER 2
7
CHAPTER 3
11
CHAPTER 4
15
CHAPTER 5
20
CHAPTER 6
23
CHAPTER 7
26
CHAPTER 8
28
CHAPTER 12
48
CHAPTER 13
52
CHAPTER 14
56
CHAPTER 15
62
CHAPTER 16
67
CHAPTER 17
69
CHAPTER 18
71
CHAPTER 19
77

CHAPTER 9
34
CHAPTER 10
37
CHAPTER 11
40
CHAPTER 20
82
CHAPTER 21
87
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About the author (2005)

Mark Twain was born Samuel L. Clemens in Florida, Missouri on November 30, 1835. He worked as a printer for a time, and then became a steamboat pilot. He traveled in the West, writing humorous sketches for newspapers. In 1865, he wrote the short story, The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County, which was very well received. He then began a career as a humorous travel writer and lecturer, publishing The Innocents Abroad in 1869, Roughing It in 1872, and, co-authored with Charles Dudley Warner, Gilded Age in 1873. His best-known works are The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876), Mississippi Writing: Life on the Mississippi (1883), and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884). He died of a heart attack on April 21, 1910.

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