The Free Negro in North Carolina, 1790-1860

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Univ of North Carolina Press, Jan 1, 1943 - Social Science - 275 pages
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John Hope Franklin has devoted his professional life to the study of the American South and African Americans. Originally published in 1943 by UNC Press, The Free Negro in North Carolina, 1790-1860 was his first book on the subject. As Franklin shows, fre
  

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Contents

Introduction
3
Growth of the Free Negro Population
14
MANUMISSION
19
MISCEGENATION
35
RUNAWAY SLAVES AND IMMIGRANT FREE NEGROES
39
MAINTAINING THE STATUS OF A FREE MAN
48
Legal Status of the Free Negro
58
THE FREE NEGRO IN COURT
81
EDUCATION
164
RELIGION
174
SOCIAL RELATIONSHIPS
182
An Unwanted People
192
THE COLONIZATION MOVEMENT
199
THE GROWING HOSTILITY TO FREE NEGROES
211
Conclusions
222
Appendices
227

CITIZENSHIP IN THE LARGER SENSE
101
The Free Negro in the Economic Life of North Carolina
121
THE FREE NEGRO PROPERTY OWNER
150
Social Life of the Free Negro
163
Bibliography
247
Bibliographic Afterword
259
Index
263
Copyright

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About the author (1943)

The son of an attorney who practiced before the U.S. Supreme Court, John Hope Franklin was born in Rentiesville, Oklahoma on January 2, 1915. He received a B. A. from Fisk University in 1935 and a master's degree in 1936 and a Ph.D. in 1941 from Harvard University. During his career in education, he taught at a numerous institutions including Brooklyn College, Harvard University, the University of Chicago, and Duke University. He also had teaching stints in Australia, China, and Zimbabwe. He has written numerous scholarly works including The Militant South, 1800-1861 (1956); Reconstruction After the Civil War (1961); The Emancipation Proclamation (1963); and The Color Line: Legacy for the 21st Century (1993). His comprehensive history From Slavery to Freedom: A History of African-Americans (1947) is generally acknowledged to be the basic survey of African American history. He received numerous awards during his lifetime including the Medal of Freedom in 1995 and the John W. Kluge Prize for the Study of Humanities in 2006. He worked with Thurgood Marshall's team of lawyers in their effort to end segregation in the 1954 case Brown v. Board of Education and participated in the 1965 march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. He was president of the American Historical Association, the Organization of American Historians, the Southern Historical Association, and the American Studies Association. He was also a founding member of the Black Academy of Arts and served on the U.S. Commission for UNESCO and the Committee on International Exchange of Scholars. He died of congestive heart failure on March 25, 2009 at the age of 94.

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