Black Rage

Front Cover
Westview Press, 1969 - Psychology - 179 pages
10 Reviews
The first book to examine the full range of black life from the vantage point of psychiatry, this widely acclaimed work has established itself as the classic statement of the desperation, conflicts, and anger of black life in America today. Black Rage tells of the insidious effects of the heritage of slavery; describes love, marriage, and the family; addresses the sexual myths and fears of blacks and whites; chronicles how the schools fail the black child; examines mental illness among black people and the psychic stresses engendered by discrimination; and, finally, focuses on the miasma of racial hatred that envelops this country, why it exists, and what will surely happen if it is not soon dispelled.
  

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Review: Black Rage: Two Black Psychiatrists Reveal the Full Dimensions of the Inner Conflicts and the Desperation of Black Life in the United States

User Review  - Rich Wertz - Goodreads

It's interesting that the book takes place a scant half generation in the past and yet the dynamics of society have changed so much for Black Life- so much so that the book almost seems out of date ... Read full review

Review: Black Rage: Two Black Psychiatrists Reveal the Full Dimensions of the Inner Conflicts and the Desperation of Black Life in the United States

User Review  - richard - Goodreads

I read it when it was published in 1968 and thought it was very good. Made a strong case as to why Blacks ought to be angry. Thought about it today when reading another book, The Art of Freedom. It must have made an impression. Had to add it to my list of books. Read full review

Contents

Whos Angry?
3
U The Shadow of the Past
23
Achieving Womanhood
39
Acquiring Manhood
55
Marriage and Love
75
Character Traits
102
The Promise of Education
130
Mental Illness and Treatment
154
How Come Theres So Much Hate?
181
Copyright

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Page 62 - If any feelings, especially those of assertive manhood, were expressed too strongly, then that slave was a threat, not only to himself and his master but to the entire system as well. For that, he would have to be killed. The black mother continues this heritage from slavery and simultaneously reflects the world she now knows. Even today, the black man cannot become too aggressive without hazard to himself. To do so is to challenge the delicate balance of a complex social system. Every mother, of...
Page 52 - Rather than having her heart broken every day, she relinquishes the struggle and diverts her interest elsewhere. She has derived none of the intensely personal satisfaction she might have received as an honored and desirable sexual object. There is another factor in her ready rejection of youth and it has deep historical roots. It has been said that beauty is a curse to a subject woman. From the time black people arrived in this country up to the very recent years black women have been sexually available...
Page 52 - ... having been fashioned by Nature in an ill-favored manner. Anatomy determines that every little girl will struggle with feelings of having been injured and mutilated when she compares her sexual organs with the male's, but under normal circumstances the compensatory blossoming of narcissism allows her to develop a feeling of satisfaction with herself. The black woman's feelings of mutilation, both psychical and physical, are strengthened by her experiences and she is guarded from self-depreciation...
Page 204 - ... it. The system achieved such refinement that the capital loss involved when a slave woman aborted could be set against the gain to be expected from forcing her into brutish labor while she was with child. America began building a potent cause in its infancy as a nation. It developed a way of life, an American ethos, a national life style which included the assumption that blacks are inferior and were born to hew wood and draw water. Newcomers to this land (if white) were immediately made to feel...
Page 213 - ... getting fed up with the bumbling stupid racism of this country? Fired not so much by any one incident as by the gradual accretion of stupidity into fixtures of national policy. All are possible, or any one, or something yet unthought. It seems certain only that on the course the nation now is headed it will happen. One might consider the possibility that, if the national direction remains unchanged, such a conflagration simply might not come about. Might not black people remain where they are,...
Page 209 - As grief lifts and the sufferer moves toward health, the hatred he had turned on himself is redirected toward his tormentors, and the fury of his attack on the one who caused him pain is in direct proportion to the depth of his grief. When the mourner lashes out in anger, it is a relief to those who love him, for they know he has now returned to health.

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About the author (1969)

William H. Grier is former chairman, Department of Psychiatry, Meharry Medical College, and former professor of Psychiatry, Wayne State University. He lives in San Diego. Price M. Cobbs is assistant clinical professor of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco; fellow, American Psychiatric Association; member, Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences; and president, Pacific Management Systems. William H. Grier is former chairman, Department of Psychiatry, Meharry Medical College, and former professor of Psychiatry, Wayne State University. He lives in San Diego. Price M. Cobbs is assistant clinical professor of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco; fellow, American Psychiatric Association; member, Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences; and president, Pacific Management Systems.

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