Johnson's New Universal Cyclopaedia: Lichfield-R (Google eBook)

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A.J. Johnson & son, 1877
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Page 84 - Our observation employed either, about external sensible objects, or about the internal operations of our minds perceived and reflected on by ourselves, is that which supplies our understandings with all the materials of thinking. These two are the fountains of knowledge, from whence all the ideas we have, or can naturally have, do spring.
Page 43 - ... all actions of account, and upon the case, other than such accounts as concern the trade of merchandise between merchant and merchant their factors or servants, all actions of debt grounded upon any lending or contract without specialty...
Page 252 - Malice in common acceptation means ill-will against a person, but in its legal sense it means a wrongful act, done intentionally, without just cause or excuse. If I give a perfect stranger a blow likely to produce death, I do it of malice, because I do it intentionally and without just cause or excuse.
Page 268 - But the passage from the physics of the brain to the corresponding facts of consciousness is unthinkable. Granted that a definite thought, and a definite molecular action in the brain occur simultaneously; we do not possess the intellectual organ, nor apparently any rudiment of the organ, which would enable us to pass, by a process of reasoning, from the one to the other.
Page 49 - ... to the rule of three." If a straggler supposed to understand Latin happened to sojourn in the neighborhood, he was looked upon as a wizard. There was absolutely nothing to excite ambition for education. Of course, when I came of age I did not know much. Still, somehow, I could read, write and cipher to the rule of three, but that was all.
Page 46 - The second section enacts, that, after the day therein mentioned, "no person shall make an entry or distress, or bring an action, to recover any land or rent, but within twenty years next after the time at [ *2S9 ] which the right to make such entry or distress, or to * bring such action, shall have first accrued...
Page 84 - Let us then suppose the mind to be, as we say, white paper, void of all characters, without any ideas; how comes it to be furnished? Whence comes it by that vast store, which the busy and boundless fancy of man has painted on it with an almost endless variety? Whence has it all the materials of reason and knowledge? To this I answer, in one word, from EXPERIENCE...
Page 84 - Whence comes it by that vast store which the busy and boundless fancy of man has painted on it with an almost endless variety? Whence has it all the materials of reason and knowledge? To this I answer in one word: from experience; in that all our knowledge is founded, and from that it ultimately derives itself.
Page 53 - She is not afraid of the snow for her household: for all her household are clothed with scarlet.
Page 49 - From 1849 to 1854, both inclusive, practiced law more assiduously than ever before. Always a Whig in politics; and generally on the Whig electoral tickets, making active canvasses. I was losing interest in politics when the repeal of the Missouri Compromise aroused me again.

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