Sense and Sensibility: A Novel (Google eBook)

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Bentley, 1882 - English fiction - 322 pages
19 Reviews
  

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Review: Sense and Sensibility

User Review  - Cathy DuPont - Goodreads

I was willing for want of my daughter, to read Sense and Sensibility. She sagaciously staged and imparted her desire by a shrewd proposal. The holiday was opportune timing with the gaiety of spirits ... Read full review

Review: Sense and Sensibility

User Review  - Gary aka Grasshopper - Goodreads

When I was a kid, growing up on the outskirts of a small city in central NY, I used to gravitate to movies that were set in Gotham. One of my favorites was My Sister Eileen which centers on the ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

I
1
II
5
III
10
IV
14
V
19
VI
22
VII
26
VIII
29
XXVI
132
XXVII
146
XXVIII
150
XXIX
160
XXX
168
XXXI
178
XXXII
185
XXXIII
193

IX
33
X
38
XI
43
XII
47
XIII
52
XIV
58
XV
62
XVI
69
XVII
75
XVIII
79
XIX
84
XX
91
XXI
98
XXII
106
XXIII
115
XXIV
121
XXV
127
XXXIV
200
XXXV
207
XXXVI
215
XXXVII
226
XXXVIII
234
XXXIX
239
XL
246
XLI
253
XLII
258
XLIII
267
XLIV
281
XLV
287
XLVI
294
XLVII
301
XLVIII
304
XLIX
315

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Popular passages

Page 320 - Marianne Dashwood was born to an extraordinary fate. She was bom to discover the falsehood of her own opinions, and to counteract, by her conduct, her most favourite maxims. She was born to overcome an affection formed so late in life as at seventeen, and with no sentiment superior to strong esteem and lively friendship, voluntarily to give her hand to another...
Page 142 - Nay, Elinor, this reproach from you! — you who have confidence in no one ! ' 'Me!' returned Elinor, in some confusion; ' indeed, Marianne, I have nothing to tell.' ' Nor I,' answered Marianne with energy ; 'our situations, then, are alike. We have neither of us anything to tell ; you, because you communicate, and I, because I conceal nothing.
Page 23 - On each side of the entrance was a sitting-room, about sixteen feet square ; and beyond them were the offices and the stairs. Four bedrooms and two garrets formed the rest of the house. It had not been built many years, and was in good repair.
Page 6 - He did not know what he was talking of, I dare say ; ten to one but he was light-headed at the time. Had he been in his right senses, he could not have thought of such a thing as begging you to give away half your fortune from your own child.
Page 78 - in a total misapprehension of character in some point or other; fancying people so much more gay or grave or ingenious or stupid than they really are, and I can hardly tell why, or in what the deception originated. Sometimes one is guided by what they say of themselves, and very frequently by what other people say of them, without giving one's self time to deliberate and judge." "But I thought it was right, Elinor," said Marianne, " to be guided wholly by the opinion of other people.
Page 48 - It is not time or opportunity that is to determine intimacy; it is disposition alone. Seven years would be insufficient to make some people acquainted with each other, and seven days are more than enough for others. I should hold myself guilty of greater impropriety in accepting a horse from my brother than from Willoughby. Of John I know very little , though we have lived together for years ; but of Willoughby my judgment has long been formed.
Page 6 - John Dashwood did not at all approve of what her husband intended to do for his sisters. To take three thousand pounds from the fortune of their dear little boy would be impoverishing him to the most dreadful degree. She begged him to think again on the subject. How could he answer it to himself to rob his child, and his only child too, of so large a sum?
Page 81 - I do not like crooked, twisted, blasted trees. I admire them much more if they are tall, straight, and flourishing. I do not like ruined, tattered cottages. 1 am not fond of nettles or thistles, or heath blossoms. I have more pleasure in a snug farm-house than a watch-tower, — and a troop of tidy, happy villagers please me better than the finest banditti in the world.
Page 73 - And how does dear, dear Norland look ?' cried Marianne. 'Dear, dear Norland,' said Elinor, 'probably looks much as it always does at this time of year—the woods and walks thickly covered with dead leaves.' ' Oh !' cried Marianne, ' with what transporting sensations have I formerly seen them fall! How have I delighted, as I walked, to see them driven in showers about me by the wind ! What feelings have they, the season, the air altogether inspired I Now there is no one to regard them. They are seen...
Page 78 - But I thought it was right, Elinor," said Marianne, " to be guided wholly by the opinion of other people. I thought our judgments were given us merely to be subservient to those of neighbours. This has always been your doctrine, I am sure.

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