High Noon on the Electronic Frontier: Conceptual Issues in Cyberspace

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Peter Ludlow
MIT Press, 1996 - Computers - 536 pages
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foreword by Mike Godwin
."..The two sides of the dispute appear in dueling essays as part of a massive collection, titled "High Noon on the Electronic Frontier," edited by Peter Ludlow and coming in June from The MIT Press. I hate the title, but this collection covers many timely issues, such as property rights, computer crime and cryptography. If you make your living by writing code, you have to read this book."
-- Peter Coffee, "PC Week"

Peter Ludlow has culled from various sources, both print and electronic, key articles on hot cyberspace policy issues, together with lively extracts from online discussions of these issues. These include the standard academic pieces along with "rants and manifestos" on a broad range of issues from the denizens of cyberspace and reflect the discourse of cyberspace itself. At times they have what Ludlow terms "a certain gonzo quality, " but nonetheless they raise serious conceptual issues in a way that illustrates precisely what is at stake. The topics covered in this timely compilation include privacy, property rights, hacking and cracking, encryption, censorship, and self and community on-line.

The writings/discussions: John Perry Barlow "Wine Without Bottles" Simson L. Garfinkel, Richard M. Stallman, and Mitchell Kapor "Why Software Patents Are Bad" The League for Programming Freedom "Against Software Patents" Paul Heckel "Debunking the Software Patent Myths" Pirate editorial "So You Want to Be a Pirate?" Mike Godwin "Some "Property" Problems in a Computer Crime Prosecution" The Mentor "The Conscience of a Hacker" Julian Dibbell "ThePrisoner: Phiber Optik Goes Directly to Jail" Dorothy E. Denning "Concerning Hackers Who Break into Computer

  

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Contents

The Economy of Mind on the Global
9
Why Patents Are Bad for Software
35
Against Software Patents
47
Debunking the Software Patent Myths
63
So You Want to Be a Pirate?
109
The Conscience of a Hacker
131
Phiber Optik Goes Directly to Jail
133
Congressional Testimony by Emmanuel Goldstein
165
The Risks of Carrying Graphic Sexual
291
Computer and Academic Freedom Newss List of Banned Files
301
Gender Swapping on the Internet
317
Identity and the Cyborg Body
327
Social Phenomena in Textbased Virtual Realities
347
A Rape in Cyberspace or How an Evil Clown a Haitian Trickster
375
A Slice of My Life in My Virtual Community
413
on community in cyberspace
437

How PGP WorksWhy Do You Need PGP?
179
Jackboots on the Infobahn
207
Achieving Electronic Privacy
225
Introduction to BlackNet
241
Censoring Cyberspace
259
Public Networks and Censorship
275
Losing Your Voice on the Internet
445
Crime and Puzzlement
459
Hardware 1 The Italian Hacker Crackdown
487
Information about Electronic Frontiers Italy ALCEI
507
Contributors
513
Copyright

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About the author (1996)

Mike Godwin is a Policy Fellow at the Center for Democracy and Technology, in Washington, D.C., and a columnist for American Lawyer magazine.

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