The New McGuffey Fourth Reader (Google eBook)

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American Book Company, 1901 - Readers - 272 pages
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Contents

I
9
II
21
III
26
IV
31
V
32
VI
38
VII
39
VIII
42
XXXII
123
XXXIII
128
XXXIV
131
XXXV
135
XXXVI
137
XXXVII
138
XXXVIII
142
XXXIX
146

IX
47
X
49
XI
52
XII
55
XIII
58
XIV
61
XV
65
XVI
68
XVII
70
XVIII
74
XIX
76
XX
78
XXI
82
XXII
87
XXIII
88
XXIV
91
XXV
92
XXVI
97
XXVII
102
XXVIII
104
XXIX
107
XXX
114
XXXI
121
XL
147
XLI
148
XLII
161
XLIII
163
XLIV
164
XLV
170
XLVI
173
XLVII
177
XLVIII
178
XLIX
192
L
194
LI
197
LII
202
LIII
209
LIV
232
LV
234
LVI
238
LVII
241
LVIII
247
LIX
248
LX
254
Copyright

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Page 235 - For verily I say unto you, Till heaven and earth pass, one jot or one tittle shall in no wise pass from the law, till all be fulfilled. Whosoever therefore shall break one of these least commandments, and shall teach men so, he shall be called the least in the kingdom of heaven : but whosoever shall do and teach them, the same shall be called great in the kingdom of heaven.
Page 129 - O'er the land of the free, and the home of the brave! And where is that band who so vauntingly swore That the havoc of war and the battle's confusion A home and a country should leave us no more? Their blood has washed out their foul footsteps
Page 110 - Then the little Hiawatha Learned of every bird its language, Learned their names and all their secrets, How they built their nests in Summer, Where they hid themselves in Winter, Talked with them whene'er he met them, Called them
Page 111 - Go, my son, into the forest, Where the red deer herd together, Kill for us a famous roebuck, Kill for us a deer with antlers!" Forth into the forest straightway All alone walked Hiawatha Proudly, with his bow and arrows; And the birds sang round him, o'er him, "Do not shoot us, Hiawatha!
Page 263 - And could only follow with the eye That joyous crowd at the piper's back. But how the Mayor was on the rack, And the wretched Council's bosoms beat, As the piper turned from the High Street To where the Weser rolled its waters Right in the way of their sons and daughters ! However, he turned from south to west, And to Koppelberg Hill his steps addressed, And after him the children pressed ; Great was the joy in every breast.
Page 258 - Smiling first a little smile, As if he knew what magic slept In his quiet pipe the while ; Then, like a musical adept, To blow the pipe his lips he wrinkled, And green and blue his sharp eyes twinkled; Like a...
Page 234 - I steal by lawns and grassy plots, I slide by hazel covers ; I move the sweet forget-me-nots That grow for happy lovers. I slip, I slide, I gloom, I glance, Among my skimming swallows ; I make the netted sunbeam dance Against my sandy shallows. I murmur under moon and stars In brambly wildernesses ; I linger by my shingly bars ; I loiter round my cresses ; And out again I curve and flow To join the brimming river, For men may come and men may go, But I go on for ever.
Page 258 - Brown rats, black rats, gray rats, tawny rats, Grave old plodders, gay young friskers, 'Fathers, mothers, uncles, cousins, Cocking tails and pricking whiskers, Families by tens and dozens, Brothers, sisters, husbands, wives Followed the Piper for their lives. From street to street he piped advancing, And step for step they followed dancing, Until they came to the river Weser Wherein all plunged and perished, Save one who, stout as Julius Caesar, Swam across and lived to carry (As he the manuscript...
Page 263 - The door in the mountain-side shut fast. Did I say all ? No! One was lame, And could not dance the whole of the way; And in after years, if you would blame His sadness, he was used to say, "It's dull in our town since my playmates left!
Page 113 - Like the birch-leaf palpitated, As the deer came down the pathway. Then upon one knee uprising, Hiawatha aimed an arrow; Scarce a twig moved with his motion, Scarce a leaf was stirred or rustled, But the wary roebuck started, Stamped with all his hoofs together, Listened with one foot uplifted, Leaped as if to meet the arrow; Ah! the singing, fatal arrow, Like a wasp it buzzed and stung him!

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