Civilization and Capitalism, 15th-18th Century: The perspective of the world

Front Cover
University of California Press, 1982 - History - 699 pages
16 Reviews
Volume III investigates what Braudel terms "world-economies"—the economic dominance of a particular city at different periods of history, from Venice to Amsterdam, London, New York.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
7
4 stars
4
3 stars
5
2 stars
0
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - keylawk - LibraryThing

The work is a wonderful example of the Annales School of historiography. A student of Lucien Febvre (1878-1956), Fernand Braudel (1902-1985) stresses long-term social, geographic and environmental ... Read full review

Review: The Wheels of Commerce (Civilization and Capitalism, 15th-18th Century #2)

User Review  - Cameron - Goodreads

A fascinating study of commercial systems in pre-industrial Europe and the second volume in Braudel's magisterial economic history. Whereas the first volume focused mainly on material life and relied ... Read full review

Contents

THE CITYCENTRED ECONOMIES OF
20
DIVISIONS OF SPACE AND TIME IN EUROPE
21
worldeconomy or worldempire?
24
3 European worldeconomies on a global scale 289
28
the problems
32
an order among other orders
45
Gothic monuments in Europe
46
Instructions in the art of war
58
of the French national market 31617
316
Diversity and unity 315 Natural and artificial links
320
The Wars of Religion in France 3267
340
simply too big? 324 Paris plus Lyon Lyon plus
344
Population density in 1745
348
Faculties living standards of provincial populations in the eighteenth century
349
The French interior 347 The interior colonized
351
How England became an island 353 The pound
365

Empire and worldeconomy 54
65
Imitations of Versailles in eighteenthcentury Europe
67
The worldeconomy and divisions of time
71
How to break down price series into different cycles
73
Grain crises in Europe 163960
74
The rhythms of the conjuncture 71 Fluctuations
78
Kondratieff cycles and the secular
80
Kondratieff cycles and the secular trend
81
The foundation of towns in central Europe
93
Thenorthern poleand its industry
97
The trade of the Hanseatic League in about 1400
105
Towns in contact with the Champagne fairs
113
The worldeconomy and bipolarity 96 The north
115
Venice fares better during the crisis than other states
121
The voyages of the galere da mercato
126
in Venice 132 Had industry become Venices major
136
The principal trade routes to and from Antwerp
144
Antwerps second boom and slump
150
French merchants registered as living in Antwerp 14501585
156
Surplus capital in Genoa between 1510 and 1625
167
A screen of barren mountains 157 Operating
169
the economy begins at home
177
The Netherlands under Burgundian rule in 1500
179
The urban population increase
186
A strip of land lacking in natural wealth 177 Agri
195
The United Provinces and Spain 2023
202
Taxing the poor 200 The United Provinces
205
The Dutch versus the Portuguese or the art of
211
Success in Asia lack of success in America
220
Calculating the accounts of the V O C
226
Struggle and success 221 The rise and fall of
232
Commodities and credit 239
243
Ships from French ports arriving in Texel
257
Links between Bordeaux and the ports of Europe
259
On the decline of Amsterdam
266
The crises of 1763 17723 17803 267 The Bata
273
NATIONAL MARKETS
277
Intermarriage in five villages in Champagne
281
The Duchy of Mantua
283
eighteenthcentury Savoy
285
The five Grosses Fermes
291
How industry and trade encouraged the growth of the monetary economy
297
Weights and measures
298
Wagemanns population density thresholds
305
Three variables three sets of dimensions 299 Three
307
France 15001750 estimates of national income money stocks and royal revenues
313
Visible continuities
314
Markets near London
368
National market and navigable waterways 16001700
369
and is created by it 365 How England became Great
375
a contribution
382
hostile but promising
388
The English and Dutch in North America in 1660
389
When the colonies worked against Europe
401
Britains positive trade balance with her American colonies
411
Europe hastens to exploit Spanish America
414
and Portugal 413 Spanish America reconsidered
417
Two American silver cycles
422
Two American gold cycles
423
collaborator as well as victim?
430
The Portuguese conquest of the coast of Africa
433
A strong state 444 The yoke of serfdom
452
The positive Russian trade balance
463
Port of St Petersburg 1778
466
The Turkish Empire
467
Turkish prices and sixteenthcentury inflation
474
Top Hane in Istanbul
481
a well
482
Native pirates off the Malabar coast
494
with a difference 491 Trading posts factories
497
Textile routes and industries in India
507
Travelling in India sixteenth century
510
Malaccas privileged position
525
The wealth of the East Indies
527
Macao early seventeenth century
531
Is any conclusion possible?
533
A thirteenthcentury grindstone
545
British imports and exports of grain and flour
559
Brickworks in England
561
Birth and death rates in England
566
British agriculture a crucial factor 558 The demo
571
Robert Owens cotton mill at New Lanark
574
The two nations in 1700
576
The new population map in 1800
577
Principal navigable waterways c 1830
585
Victory in longdistance trade 575 The spread
587
the puttingout system 593 The industrialists
595
The Coal Exchange in London
606
Great Britains trade with the rest of the world 6023
612
The housewifes shopping basket
616
Finance and capitalism 601 How important
617
Notes
633
Index
679
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1982)

Fernan Braudel was the author of several acclaimed histories, including "A History of Civilizations", "On History", "The Structures of Everyday Life", & "The Wheels of Commerce". He died in 1985.

Bibliographic information