The life of George Washington (Google eBook)

Front Cover
F. Andrews, 1839 - 562 pages
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Contents

Troops march to Wills Creek
38
Approved by Washington 433
42
Complaints of Washingtons Officers
46
Terms of Capitulation
53
Patriotic Zeal and Activity of Franklin
59
His Conduct in the Battle
63
Battle at Braddocks Defeat
64
CHAPTER IV
67
Anecdotes
73
A Line of Forts as a Barrier to the Frontier
79
CHAPTER V
85
His Fears for the Fate of the Expedition
91
Washington furnishes to General Forbes a Line of March
93
Elected a Member of the House of Burgesses
99
Anecdote
105
Tour to the Ohio
112
Attends the Convention at Williamsburg
119
Washingtons Sentiments on the State of Affairs
127
Ascertains the State of the Army
133
Corresponds with numerous Public Bodies
139
Deficiency of Powder in Camp
145
Slow Progress of Enlistments
151
Washington proposes an Attack on Boston
157
Congress award a Vote of Thanks and a Medal to Washington
163
Military Works inspected
165
Washington visits Congress at Philadelphia
166
Strength of the American Army
175
Effects of the recent Defeat
181
HeadQuarters at Morristown 220
184
Skirmish near Haerlem and Death of Colonel Knowlton
187
Injurious Effects of an irregular System of Bounties
193
Capture of Fort Washington
199
Washingtons Firmness and Spirit under Reverses
205
Battle of Trenton
211
Retires to Winter Quarters at Morristown
217
Washingtons Counter Proclamation
220
Sufferings of the Prisoners in New York
224
Washingtons first Meeting with Lafayette
230
Washington retreats to Philadelphia
236
Skirmishes at Whitemarsh
242
Favored by a Party in Congress
249
CHAPTER XI
255
Congress reluctant to grant Halfpay
261
Paper Money made a legal Tender
307
Capture of Major Andre
314
CHAPTER XIII
320
Powers of Congress doubtful and inefficient
324
Letter to the Manager of his Plantations
330
Success of Lafayette in Virginia
337
Congress pass a Vote of Thanks to the Officers and Troops
343
Lafayette returns to France
350
Negotiations for Peace
356
Washingtons Opinion of them
363
Disbanding of the Army
369
Refuses to receive Remuneration for his Services
375
Recommends Surveys of the Western Rivera
381
Plan of Farms at Mount Vernon
386
His Gardens and Orchards
387
Houdons Bust of Washington
390
Washingtons Sentiments on the State of Public Affairs
392
Society of the Cincinnati
398
His Preparations for acting in the Convention
401
CHAPTER XVI
407
Ceremonies and Social Visits
413
Numerous Applications for Office
419
Portrait of Mrs Washington by Stuart
424
Funding System
425
Foreign Influence operating on the Indians
431
Tour through the Southern States
434
CHAPTER XVIII
442
Portrait of Washington by Stuart
442
Chosen a second Time President of the United States
445
Democratic Societies
452
Congress put the Country in a State of Defence
458
Senate advises the Ratification
464
British Treaty opposed in the House of Representatives
470
Anecdote
477
Conduct of the French Directory
483
His Character
492
Origin and Genealogy of the Washington Family
497
Rules of Behavior
513
Washingtons Farewell Address
525
Last Illness and Death of Washington
531
Proceedings of Congress in Consequence of the Death
539
Washingtons Will
545

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 67 - As a remarkable instance of this, I may point out to the public that heroic youth, Colonel Washington, whom I cannot but hope Providence has hitherto preserved in so signal a manner for some important service to his country.
Page 410 - In this conflict of emotions, all I dare aver is, that it has been my faithful study, to collect my duty from a just appreciation of every circumstance by which it might be affected.
Page 403 - Thus I consent, sir, to this Constitution, because I expect no better and because I am not sure that it is not the best.
Page 443 - The confidence of the whole Union is centred in you. Your being at the helm will be more than an answer to every argument, which can be used to alarm and lead the people in any quarter into violence or secession. North and south will hang together, if they have you to hang on...
Page 448 - The cabinet decided unanimously, that a proclamation should be issued, "forbidding the citizens of the United States to take part in any hostilities on the seas, either with or against the belligerent powers, and warning them against carrying to any such powers any of those articles deemed contraband according to the modern usages of nations, and enjoining them from all acts and proceedings inconsistent with the duties of a friendly nation towards those at war.
Page 424 - I have learned too much of the vanity of human affairs to expect felicity from the scenes of public life. I am still determined to be cheerful and happy in whatever situation I may be ; for I have also learned from experience that the greater part of our happiness or misery depends on our dispositions, and not on our circumstances..
Page 396 - Union, at a time and place to be agreed upon, to take into consideration the trade of the United States ; to consider how far a uniform system in their commercial regulations may be necessary to their common interest and their permanent harmony ; and to report to the several States such an act, relative to this great object, as, when ratified by them, will enable the United States in Congress effectually to provide for the same.
Page 410 - I have been too much swayed by a grateful remembrance of former instances, or by an affectionate sensibility to this transcendent proof of the confidence of my fellow-citizens ; and have thence too little consulted my incapacity as well as disinclination for the weighty and untried cares before me ; my error will be palliated by the motives which misled me, and its consequences be judged by my country with some share of the partiality in which they originated.
Page 539 - Mr. Speaker: The melancholy event which was yesterday announced with doubt, has been rendered but too certain. Our WASHINGTON is no more \ The Hero, the Sage, and the Patriot of America the man on whom in times of danger every eye was turned and all hopes were placed lives now only in his own great actions, and in the hearts of an affectionate and afflicted people.
Page 30 - One of them fired at Mr. Gist or me, not fifteen steps off, but fortunately missed. We took this fellow into custody, and kept him until about nine o'clock at night, then let him go, and walked all the remaining part of the night without making any stop, that we might get the start so far as to be out of the reach of their pursuit the next day, since we were well assured they would follow our track as soon as it was light.

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