Ingulph's chronicle of the abbey of Croyland: with the continuations by Peter of Blois and anonymous writers (Google eBook)

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H. G. Bohn, 1854 - Crowland Abbey - 546 pages
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Page 210 - Come near now, and kiss me, my son. And he came near, and kissed him: and he smelled the smell of his raiment, and blessed him, and said, See, the smell of my son is as the smell of a field which the LORD hath blessed...
Page 318 - John, by the Grace of God, king of England, lord of Ireland, duke of Normandy and Aquitaine, and count of Anjou...
Page 524 - Henry, by the grace of God, King of England and France, and Lord of Ireland, To all to whom these present Letters shall come greeting; Know ye, that we...
Page 156 - Lord of Bourne and Deeping, being a man of agricultural pursuits, got permission from the monks of Crowland, for twenty marks of silver, to enclose as much as he would of the common marshes. So he shut out the Welland by a strong embankment, and building thereon numerous tenements and cottages, in a short time he formed a large
Page 201 - ... and was now known only to a few of the more aged; that so the younger ones, being instructed to read this character, might be more competent to use the documents of their monastery against their adversaries in their old age. These chirographs, being kept in a certain old chest, which was enclosed by the wall of the church, were the only ones that were saved, and escaped the fire. These are now our chief and principal documents, which were formerly secondary, and put aside, having been long lightly...
Page 348 - Put not your trust in princes, Nor in the son of man, in whom there is no help. His breath goeth forth, he returneth to his earth; In that very day his thoughts perish.
Page 144 - At one time the Abbot of Crowland was "so impoverished by men invading the manors, granges and other places thereof against the will of the abbot and convent and keepers of the same, carrying away their goods...
Page 239 - From this little fountain which hath swelled into a great river, we now behold the city of God made glad, and all England rendered fruitful by many teachers and doctors issuing from Cambridge, after the likeness of the holy paradise.
Page 67 - Expences of the Prosecution shall be thereout defrayed ; and then such satisfaction shall be made thereout to the Party or Parties injured, as the said Justices shall think proper ; and afterwards so much of the said Penalty shall be paid to the Informer or Informers as such Justices shall think fit...
Page 466 - Antiquarian Library, 1893), 466]) When both armies had now become so extremely fatigued with the labour of marching and thirst that they could proceed no further, they joined battle near the town of Tewkesbury. After the result had long remained doubtful, King Edward at last gained a glorious victory. Upon this occasion, there were slain on the queen's side, either on the field or after the battle, by the avenging hands of certain persons...

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