The Woman Beneath the Skin: A Doctor's Patients in Eighteenth-century Germany

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Harvard University Press, 1998 - Medical - 241 pages
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In this provocative study, Barbara Duden asserts that the most basic biological and medical terms that we use to describe our own bodies--male and female, healthy or sick--are indeed cultural constructions. To illustrate this, Duden delves into the records of an eighteenth-century German physician who meticulously documented the medical histories of eighteen hundred women of all ages and backgrounds, often in their own words.
  

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Review: The Woman Beneath the Skin: A Doctor's Patients in Eighteenth-Century Germany

User Review  - Charles - Goodreads

Bizarre stuff and difficult to wrap my head around, but fascinating. Read full review

Contents

Toward a History of the Body
1
Johann Storch and Womens Complaints
50
Works by Johann Storch 787
187
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

Barbara Duden has been on the faculty of the Science, Technology, and Society Program at Pennsylvania State University and is currently a Fellow at the Institute for Cultural Studies, Essen, Germany.

Gesine Schwan is a professor of political science at Freie Universitat Berlin. Thomas Dunlap's translations include Ute Deichmann's "Biologists under Hitler.

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