The Street Book: An Encyclopedia of Manhattan's Street Names and Their Origins (Google eBook)

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Fordham Univ Press, Jan 1, 1990 - History - 119 pages
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The Street Book contains brief biographical sketches for more than one hundred of Manhattan's well- and lesser-known streets. With photographs, period drawings, and reproductions of old newspapers, The Street Book is a visual treat as well. The detailed topographical maps of Manhattan provide an easy reference for locating streets, and even make it possible to use The Street Book as a walking guide.
  

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User Review  - EctopicBrain - LibraryThing

I've had this book before. Someone borrowed it and never returned it. Bummer. anyway I now have another copy and as I browse through it I cannot help wonder about the politics that must go on behind naming anything in NYC. Great reference book! Read full review

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Page 7 - After proceeding one hundred leagues, we found a very pleasant situation among some steep hills, through which a very large river, deep at its mouth, forced its way to the sea; from the sea to the estuary of the river, any ship heavily laden might pass, with the help of the tide, which rises eight feet. But as we were riding at anchor in a good berth, we would not venture up in our vessel, without a knowledge of the mouth; therefore we took the boat, and entering the river we found the country on...
Page 7 - They came towards us with evident delight, raising loud shouts of admiration, and showing us where we could most securely land with our boat. We passed up this river, about half a league, when we found it formed a most beautiful lake three leagues in circuit, upon which they were rowing thirty or more of their small boats, from one shore to the other, rilled with multitudes who came to see us.
Page 8 - Island was rocky, and covered by a dense forest ; the lower part grassy, and rich in wild fruits and flowers. Grapes and strawberries grew in abundance in the fields, and nuts of various kinds were plentiful in the forests, which were also filled with abundance of game. The brooks and ponds were swarming with fish, and the soil was of luxuriant fertility. In the vicinity of the present
Page 9 - ... frogs and water-snakes. A little rivulet connected this marsh with the Fresh Water Pond, which was also connected, by the stream which formed its outlet, with another strip of marshy land, covering the region now occupied by James, Cherry, and the adjacent streets. An unbroken chain of waters was thus stretched across the island from James street at the southeast to Canal street at the northwest. An inlet occupied the place of Broad street, a marsh covered the vicinity of Ferry street, Rutgers...
Page 7 - We passed up this river about half a league, when we found it formed a most beautiful lake three leagues in circuit, upon which they were rowing thirty or more of their small boats, from one shore to the other, filled with multitudes who came to see us. All of a sudden, as is wont to happen to navigators, a violent contrary wind blew in from the sea, and forced us to return to our ship, greatly regretting to leave this region which seemed so commodious and delightful, and which we supposed must also...
Page 11 - In considering that subject they could not but bear in mind that a city is to be composed principally of the habitations of men, and that straight-sided and right-angled houses are the most cheap to build and the most convenient to live in.
Page 8 - ... Hook. The topography of New York Island, as it was first seen by Hudson, was as follows : " The lower part of it consisted of wood-crowned hills and beautiful grassy valleys, including a chain of swamps and marshes and a deep pond. Northward, it rose into a rocky, high ground. The sole inhabitants were a tribe of dusky Indians, an off-shoot from the great nation of the Lenni Lenape, who inhabited the vast territory bounded by the Penobscot and Potomac, the Atlantic and Mississippi, dwelling...
Page 8 - Grapes and strawberries grew in abundance in the fields, and nuts of various kinds were plentiful in the forests, which were also filled with abundance of game. The brooks and ponds were swarming with fish, and the soil was of luxuriant fertility. In the vicinity of the present " Tombs " was a deep, clear, and beautiful pond of fresh water (with a picturesque little island in the middle) so deep, indeed, that it could have floated the largest ship in our navy, which was for a long time deemed...
Page 8 - Eiver, near the foot of James street. Smaller ponds dotted the Island in various places, two of which, lying near each other, in the vicinity of the present corner of the Bowery and Grand street, collected the waters of the high grounds which surrounded them. To the northwest of the Fresh Water Pond, or "Kolck," as it afterwards came to be called, beginning in the vicinity of the present St.

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About the author (1990)


Henry Moscow is a late newspaper and magazine editor and the author of numerous books on subjects as diverse as gardening and psychology.

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