The Deaf and Dumb: Or, A Collection of Articles Relating to the Condition of Deaf Mutes; Their Education, and the Principal Asylums Devoted to Their Instruction (Google eBook)

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D. K. Hitchcock, 1836 - Deaf - 312 pages
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Page 255 - Tunes her nocturnal note: thus with the year Seasons return, but not to me returns Day, or the sweet approach of even or morn, Or sight of vernal bloom, or summer's rose, Or flocks, or herds, or human face divine; But cloud instead, and ever-during dark Surrounds me, from the cheerful ways of men Cut off, and for the book of knowledge fair Presented with a universal blank Of Nature's works to me expunged and rased, And wisdom at one entrance quite shut out.
Page 65 - That man is not the discoverer of any art who first says the thing ; but he who says it so long, and so loud, and so clearly, that he compels mankind to hear him...
Page 217 - I lay down this position : that if it is our duty to instill divine truth into the minds of children as soon as they are able to receive it ; if we are bound by the injunction of Christ to convey the glad news of salvation to...
Page 37 - Gallaudet, in 1817, waste conduct the daily and weekly devotional exercises by signs ; and the deaf mutes have been thus taught to address the Father of their spirits in their own natural language, and have been admitted to the new privilege of social worship. In applying the first principles to the course of instruction in language, an important improvement has been made, by combining words into phrases as early as possible, and thus teaching the pupil how to use them. The idea of each phrase is...
Page 287 - They see our words, and our uttered thoughts become to them visible. Our ideas, expressed in speech, strike their ears in vain ; their eyes receive them, as they part from our lips ; they conceive by intuition, and speak by imitation. Mr. Braidwood first teaches them the letters and their powers, and the ideas of words written, beginning with the most simple.
Page 37 - Asylum (and we presume in others derived from it) are made acquainted with the simple truths of religion and morality in one year; a period in which, in most European institutions, they are scarcely advanced beyond the knowledge of sounds, and the names of sensible objects, qualities and actions, or the most common phrases. By communicating this instruction in the natural sign language, pupils, whose inferior capacity or advanced age would...
Page 37 - ... excited by the objects which he sees, or the events of his own life. He easily comprehends those of others, and is thus led to learn the names of the simple emotions and acts of the mind. Hence he is brought to think of an invisible agent, which we term the soul, as the feeling and percipient being; and, by a natural transition, is led by the use of signs alone,, to the Great Spirit, as the First Cause; to his character, as our Creator and Benefactor; and to a knowledge of his law and our future...
Page 48 - To this is added the descriptive signs of opening the book, placing it before the eyes, and moving the lips as in reading. It may therefore simplify the classification of natural signs if the first two divisions be united ; and it will be sufficiently accurate to say that all the signs used by the deaf and dumb, are either descriptive or conventional. By far the greater part of these signs belong to the former class ; as it includes the signs for most common objects, actions, and emotions. A deaf...
Page 162 - Author ; but, farther, to produce by speech whatever he desires, in conformity with the laws of his existence. This divine mode of speaking almost disappeared from the earth, along with so many other perfections, at that unhappy epoch, the fall. Hardly, in the long course of ages since elapsed, has the precious prerogative been accorded to a few privileged individuals. These were no other than souls, sanctified and united to God by fervent and continual prayer ; who, interrogating the very essences...
Page 224 - But, as it is written, To whom he was not spoken of, they shall see : and they that have not heard shall understand.

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