The Tao of Islam: A Sourcebook on Gender Relationships in Islamic Thought

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SUNY Press, Jan 1, 1992 - Religion - 397 pages
8 Reviews
An anthology of Islamic teachings that use gender symbolism to explain the relationships between God and the world, the world and the human being, and the human being and God. Murata (religious studies, State U. of New York) focuses on Sufis and translations from over 30 Muslims. She argues that the core of Islamic thought is not in the nature of things but in the relationships between then. Paper edition (unseen), $19.95. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR
  

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Review: Tao of Islam: A Sourcebook on Gender Relationships in Islamic Thought

User Review  - فاتنة شاكر - Goodreads

Read it almost 10 years ago. Fresh, creative outlook on gender issues in Islam. Written with a deep , sweet sense of Sufism. Worth rereading it . Read full review

Review: Tao of Islam: A Sourcebook on Gender Relationships in Islamic Thought

User Review  - Uzma Naz - Goodreads

not recommended Read full review

Contents

The Three Realities
23
Qualitative Correspondence
27
Qualitative Levels
31
Human AllComprehensiveness
33
Children of the Elements
37
The Myth of Adams Creation
39
Human Becoming
43
The Cosmic and Human Books
45
Mans Degree over Woman II
177
Mutual Love
181
Women Made Lovable
183
The Fusus alhikam
188
Mutual Longing
190
Witnessing God in Women
191
Marriage and Creation
193
Perfect Sexual Union
195

Divine Duality
49
Incomparability and Similarity
51
Complementary Names
55
God and His Vassal
57
The One and the Two
58
The Creation of the Many
61
The Differentiation of the Undifferentiated
62
Being and Knowledge
66
Majesty and Beauty
69
Awe and Intimacy
74
Social Implications of Divine Duality
76
The Two Hands of God
81
Right and Left
82
The Views of Koran Commentators
84
Fingers and Feet
85
The Two Hands in the Futuhat almakkiyya
88
The Fusus alhikam
91
Muayyid alDm Jandi
92
Abd alRazzaq Kashani
96
Ddwud Qaysari
99
Sadr alDin Qunawi
101
Said alDln Farghanl
105
Farghani on the Two Handfuls
109
Heaven and Earth
117
The Tao of Heaven and Earth
121
Heaven and Earth as Correlative Terms
123
Similitudes
127
Shifting Relationships
130
The Seven Heavens
133
The Four Elements
135
The Virtues of the Earth
139
Macrocosmic Marriage
143
Fathers and Mothers
144
Universal Marriage
147
Triplicity
151
The Pen and the Tablet
153
The Intellect and the Soul
155
Natural Children
158
Changing Relationships
161
The Faces of the Intellect
164
The Two Wings of Gabriel
168
Human Marriage
171
Mans Degree over Woman I
173
The Symbolism of Grammatical Gender
196
Spiritual Counsel
199
The Womb
203
The Mercy of Existence
206
Nature as Wife and Mother
209
Love for Parents
212
The Womb as Microcosm
215
The Womb as Nature
218
STATIC HIERARCHY
225
Names of the Unseen
229
Spirit
232
Soul
236
Intellect
238
The Spirits Kingdom
242
Heaven and Earth
243
Dynamics of the Soul
249
The Souls Evil
254
Conflicting Character Traits
257
The Souls Receptivity
260
Manliness and Chivalry
266
Negative Masculinity
269
Adam Eve and Iblis
273
The Souls Animals
277
Purifying the Soul
283
The Heart
289
Between Spirit and Soul
292
The Heart in the School of Ibn alArabl
299
The Birth of the Heart
304
The Hearts Birth According to Izz alDm Kashanl
306
The Hearts Birth According to Ibn alArabt s School
311
The Soul as Virgin Mother
313
The Perfected Heart
314
True Men and True Women
316
Postscript
321
Chronological List of Authors Cited
327
Notes on Authors Cited
329
Notes
333
Bibliography
357
Index of Koranic Verses
363
Index of Hadiths and Sayings
379
General Index
385
Copyright

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Page 10 - The separateness implicit in dualistic explanations of relationships conduces to an essentialistic interpretation of the world, a world of "things" characterized by discreteness, finality, closedness, determinateness, independence, a world in which one thing is related to the "other

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About the author (1992)

Sachiko Murata is Professor of Religious Studies at the State University of New York, Stony Brook.

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