Epodes. Latin & English

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Harvard University Press, 2004 - Literary Criticism - 350 pages
9 Reviews

The poetry of Horace (born 65 BCE) is richly varied, its focus moving between public and private concerns, urban and rural settings, Stoic and Epicurean thought. Here is a new Loeb Classical Library edition of the great Roman poet's Odes and Epodes, a fluid translation facing the Latin text.

Horace took pride in being the first Roman to write a body of lyric poetry. For models he turned to Greek lyric, especially to the poetry of Alcaeus, Sappho, and Pindar; but his poems are set in a Roman context. His four books of odes cover a wide range of moods and topics. Some are public poems, upholding the traditional values of courage, loyalty, and piety; and there are hymns to the gods. But most of the odes are on private themes: chiding or advising friends; speaking about love and amorous situations, often amusingly. Horace's seventeen epodes, which he called iambi, were also an innovation for Roman literature. Like the odes they were inspired by a Greek model: the seventh-century iambic poetry of Archilochus. Love and political concerns are frequent themes; here the tone is generally that of satirical lampoons. "In his language he is triumphantly adventurous," Quintilian said of Horace; this new translation reflects his different voices.

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Review: Odes and Epodes (Loeb Classical Library)

User Review  - Birgitta Hoffmann - Goodreads

Niall Rudd's translation actually manages to stay clos-ish to the text and still be quite readable. Read full review

Review: Odes and Epodes (Loeb Classical Library)

User Review  - Katie - Goodreads

For folks who studied Latin, you may feel his translations are a bit off, or modernized for easier consumption. It's nice they're there though so you don't have to look at your dictionary constantly. Read full review

Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
METRES
12
HYMN FOR A NEW AGE
262
Copyright

2 other sections not shown

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About the author (2004)

Horace is one of the most noted poets and satirists of Ancient times. Born Quintus Horatius Flaccus, to a former slave in 65 B.C., Horace was taken to Rome and Athens to be educated. He joined Brutus's army after the assassination of Julius Caesar, and later came under favor of the emperor Octavian. Horace used his observations of politics to great advantage in his works. Horace is chiefly remembered for his four books of Odes. Technically and lyrically stunning, they contain word organization and imagery that is employed masterfully. He is also noted for the brilliant satires that brought him to the attention of the poet Virgil. Virgil introduce him to Maecenas, a wealthy patron, who would help Horace throughout his life. Horace earned a great reputation during his lifetime and was an example to many later generations of poets. Horace died in 8 B.C., a few months after his friend and patron Maecenas.

Niall Rudd is Emeritus Professor of Latin at Bristol University. He has previously translated Juvenal's Satires for Oxford World's Classics. Jonathan Powell is Professor of Latin at the University of Newcastle upon Tyne. He is preparing a new text of De Republica and De Legibus for the Oxford
Classical Texts series.

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