The Earth Moved: On the Remarkable Achievements of Earthworms

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Frances Lincoln, 2004 - Earthworms - 224 pages
86 Reviews
The august Charles Darwin devoted the last years of his life to the meticulous study of one animal: the earthworm. It may be small, spineless and blind, but its role in the ecosystem is profound. It tills the soil, destroys microscopic organisms that cause plant disease, breaks down toxins and turns the ground into rich compost, creating the most fertile areas on earth. In a witty and offbeat encomium to this humble creature, Amy Stewart weaves her own back garden investigations with those of the eccentric oligochaetologists who have made the close study of worms their personal obsession. From the legendary giant Australian worm that burrows up to fifteen feet below the ground to the modest nightcrawler that inspired Darwin to write his last book and Amy Stewart's own collection of red wrigglers, The Earth Moves finally gives worms their due and exposes the hidden and extraordinary universe below our feet.

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Her prose is articulate, funny, and smooth reading. - Goodreads
It's a great educational and entertaining read! - Goodreads
Some pictures would have been nice! - Goodreads
First, there were no pictures. - Goodreads

Review: The Earth Moved: On the Remarkable Achievements of Earthworms

User Review  - Justin Howe - Goodreads

If you read only one book on earth worms in your life, it should be this one. Of course, before I read this book I didn't know of any other books written on the subject, so there's that to consider. Read full review

Review: The Earth Moved: On the Remarkable Achievements of Earthworms

User Review  - Erica - Goodreads

Didn't contain very much information. She repeats several points several times, and never really goes in depth with one thing. I don't particularly like this style of journalism unless it's done really well. This one is pretty boring. Two stars because I like worms. Read full review

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