Chaka

Front Cover
Heinemann, 1981 - Fiction - 168 pages
7 Reviews
This novel is the first of many works of literature that takes the great Zulu leader, king, and emperor as its subject.
  

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Review: Chaka

User Review  - Joanna - Goodreads

A fascinating telling of the tale of Chaka, Zulu king and mass murderer. At first, it seems like a history of a great leader and ambitious creator of the Zulu people. Then, the story becomes ... Read full review

Review: Chaka

User Review  - Jerome Kuseh - Goodreads

Chaka was one of the first of Africa's significant contribution to classic world literature. This novel gives a highly fictionalised account of the great Shaka, from the circumstances surrounding his ... Read full review

Contents

Nandi chooses Chaka i
1
Senzangakhona disowns Nandi
7
Chaka kills a Lion
15
Chaka is visited by the King of the Deep
21
Chaka leaves home in flight
27
Chaka meets Isanusi
34
Isanusi strengthens Chaka with medicine
42
Ndlebe and Malunga come to Chaka
55
Chaka is installed as his Fathers Successor
84
Chaka acquires
90
The New National Name
97
The Reforms and Changes brought about
105
The Death of Noliwa
121
The Killing of the Cowards
127
Mzilikazi
135
Concerning Nongogo and Mnyamana
142

Chaka captures Zwide
61
Noliwa
70
Chaka and Isanusi at Senzangakhonas
76
The Death of Nandi
148
Donga LukaTatiyana
161
Copyright

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About the author (1981)

Mofolo is not only the father of literature in his native Sesotho language, but is also widely considered to be the father of modern black South African writing. Educated in Protestant mission schools, Mofolo worked as a teacher in the mission school system and regarded his writings as an instrument for the propagation of the Christian faith among the Sotho-speaking people. He is best known for his ostensibly biographical, but largely fictional, narrative Chaka (1925). The novel presents a satanic image of the great Zulu general of that name, reflecting his adherence to traditional Zulu magic. Mofolo also wrote three other works that are deeply rooted in Christian morality. Moeti Oa Bochabela (Traveller of the East) (1907) presents a romantic journey to the East in a quest for the truth, reminiscent of John Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress. L'Ange Dechu (The Fallen Angel), which remains unpublished, was written in reaction against the effusive sentimentality of popular romances. And Pitseng (In the Pot) is an autobiographical account of Mofolo's own school days.

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