The new seaman's guide and coaster's companion, improved from the original work of J. Chandler [and others]. (Google eBook)

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1809
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Page 174 - ... opinion as to the direction of a line from Lancaster to Carlisle, by way of Penrith. Commencing at Carlisle, the ground is favourable along the valley of the River Petril as far as Penrith, at this Town expensive and difficult ground begins to shew itself. Two Lines present themselves here, one on the East and the other on the West side of the Town ; the East line running near Clifton by Milkinthorpe and Thrimby to Shap, and the West line following the course of the River Lowther to near the...
Page 102 - Finisierre, which ought always to be guarded against, especially in thick weather. It frequently happens, that ships coming into the channel have not had an observation for some days back ; which, together with the operation of scant and contrary winds, and the setting of the tides, tend to perplex and bewilder the most experienced mariner, when thick weather prevents his getting a sight of the land.
Page 33 - By its being in a bay towards the east, the tide of ebb, from between the Isle of Wight and the main, falls into that bay, and forces its way into the river, so as to raise the water for an hour and a half; at which period the water without the bar, by its falling below the level of that within, produces a second ebb for the space of three hours, or until it is low water.
Page 17 - Dover Strait be prevented by wind or tide, or otherwise, from proceeding to the southward at the back of the Goodwin, or to the eastward thereof, it...
Page 147 - Staples, that the sufferers may have the satisfaction of knowing their distress is perceived from the shore and that relief will be sent them as soon as possible. In case of bad weather the flag will be kept up, a gun fired morning and evening, and a rocket thrown up every night from the north turret, till such time as relief can be sent.
Page 147 - Whoever brings the first notice of any ship or vessel being in distress, is entitled to a premium, in proportion, to the distance from the castle ; and if between twelve o'clock at night and three in...
Page 103 - SW of Ireland, but its exact direction remains to be determined. The middle of the current appears to preserve its original course in a greater degree than its borders, and to set NW by W. The eastern border more north, and the western more west, so that the northern current is much stronger close to the west of Scilly than further out. If a ship crosses the current obliquely, steering a true E. by S. course, or more southerly, she will continue in it longer, and be more affected by it, than if she...
Page 147 - Holy-Island fishermen, who, by the advantage of their situation can put off for the islands at times when no boat from the main land can get over the breakers. Premiums are given to the first boats that put off for the islands, to give their assistance to ships or vessels in distress ; and provisions and liquors are sent in the boats.
Page 147 - In every great storm two men on horseback are sent from the castle to patrol along the coast from sunset to sunrise, that, in case of an accident, one may remain by the ship, and the other return to alarm the castle. Whoever brings the first notice of any ship or vessel...
Page 164 - Along the outer edge of the shoal, the flood sets to the southward and the ebb to the northward, the velocity not exceeding half a knot in moderate weather, but much influenced by the wind. There can be no question, I think, that in all the currents over the shoals, through the swashes or rudimental channels, and those exterior to the shoals, the direction and force of the wind exercise much influence...

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