Mygale: City Lights Noir

Front Cover
City Lights Publishers, Jan 1, 2003 - Fiction - 129 pages
5 Reviews

This unsettling novel inspired Pedro Almodovar's acclaimed new film "The Skin I Live In." Movie premieres in the U.S October 2011.

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Mygale [MIG-uh-lee] n.: a genus of large tropical spiders. . . .

Richard Lafargue, a well-known plastic surgeon, pursues and captures Vincent Moreau, who raped Lafargue's daughter and left her hopelessly mad in an asylum. Lafargue is determined to exact an atrocious vengeance, and an ambiguous, even sadomasochistic relationship develops between self-appointed executioner and victim.

"'Ingenious,' 'elegant,' 'sinister' – these are also adjectives that approximate, but fall short of, the narrative power of Mygale. Much like Poe's 'tales of terror,' Mygale is a story that invites both respect and repulsion: As a reader, you're happy to have read it . . . and just as happy, ultimately, to close the covers on its weird world." --Maureen Corrigan, Washington Post Book World

"Great art in nightmarish darkness." --Michel Lebrun

Thierry Jonquet (b. 1954, Paris) is an exponent of the hardboiled style of French noir that is inflected by post-May 1968 politics and social critique. His crime novels and children's books have garnered many literary prizes.

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Review: Mygale

User Review  - Mizuki - Goodreads

Take my words, This book is fascinating. The story is a brilliant but bizarre mixture of thriller and erotica, a complicative, finely crafted tale of revenge and suffering, domination and submission ... Read full review

Review: Mygale

User Review  - Urenna Sander - Goodreads

Mygale is the story of an esteemed plastic surgeon, Dr. Richard Lafargue, tracks down and imprisons the young man (Vincent) who raped his daughter. The hostage does not divulge he and a friend, named ... Read full review

References to this book

About the author (2003)

Thierry Jonquet (b. 1954, Paris) has sold soap, painted white lines on the road, taught juvenile delinquents and worked in geriatric hospitals as an occupational therapist. Jonquet is an exponent of the hardboiled style of French noir that is inflected by post-May 1968 politics and social critique. His main source of inspiration is the daily newspaper, a trove of anecdotal evidence of, in his words, "the barbarity of the world we live in." But his writing is not so much politically engagé as cathartic. Jonquet’s crime novels and children's books have garnered many literary prizes.

Donald Nicholson-Smith has translated many works of fiction and nonfiction from the French, including The Society of the Spectacle by Guy Debord, The Production of Space by Henri Lefebvre, The Revolution of Everyday Life by Raoul Vaneigem, and Three to Kill by Jean-Patrick Manchette.

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