Early Connecticut Houses: An Historical and Architectural Study (Google eBook)

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Preston and Rounds Company, 1900 - Architecture, Domestic - 303 pages
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In my opinion, Early Connecticut Houses is a treasure, not only for architectural historians but for any student of New England history and culture.

Contents

4 The John Clark House Exterior
18
5 Overhangs
19
6 The Gleason House Present Exterior
21
7 First Story Plan
22
Cross Section
23
9 Longitudinal Section
24
Perspective of Framing
25
11 Overhang
26
12 The Lewis House First Story Plan
27
13 The Cowles House Present Exterior
29
The Whitman House Present Exterior
31
15 First Story Plan
33
16 Sections
34
17 The Drop
35
18 The Moore House Restored Exterior
37
19 Skeleton Plan
38
20 The Joseph Whiting House Present Exterior
40
House First Story Plan
42
22 The DorusBarnard House Exterior
44
23 First Story Plan
45
Attic Floor Framing r
46
25 Section Thro Roof
47
CHAPTER III
49
The Hollister House South Glastonbury 2 The Patterson House Berlin 3 The John Barnard House Hartford
52
The Hollister House Present Exterior
53
First Story Plan
54
28 Cross Section
56
29 The Patterson House Present Exterior
58
30 First Story Plan
60
Cross Section
62
32 The John Barnard House Exterior
64
First Story Plan
65
The Third Period in the Connecticut Colony 17001750
67
34 The Barrett House Present Exterior
71
36 First Story Plan
73
37 Framing Scheme
74
38 The Sheldon Woodbridge House Present Exterior
76
House Framing Scheme
80
The Sheldon Woodbridge House Second Story Plan
81
42 The Webb House Present Exterior
83
First Story Plan
84
44 The Ebenezer Grant House Present Exterior
87
House First Story Plan
89
46 The Ebenezer Grant House Detail of Doorway
91
CHAPTER V
93
The Henry Whitfield
96
47 The Gov Eaton House Southwest View from Lambert
97
48 Restored First Story Plan
101
49 Restored Second Story Plan
106
The Henry Whitfield House Present Exterior
112

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 205 - Sawing by the hundred not above 43. 6d. for boards. 55. for plancks. 55. 6d. for slitworke and to be payd for no more than they cutt full and true measure. If by the dayes worke, the top man or he that guides the worke and phaps findes the tooles, not above 2s. 6d. a day in somr, and the pitt ma, and he whose skill and charge is lesse, not above 2s, and a proportionable in winter as before. If they be equall in skill and charge, then to agree or divide the 43. 6d. betwixt them." The planks above...
Page 110 - It was built in the form of a capital E, had many apartments in it and nineteen fire-places. Mr. Davenport's house, on the opposite side of Elm street, near State street, was built in the form of a cross, with the chimney in the centre. "That Mr. Davenport's house had also many apartments, and thirteen fire-places," says President Stiles, in his History of the Judges, "I very well remember, having frequently, when a boy, been all over the house.
Page 245 - ... above 3 inches in thickness, or above 7 inches in breadth, and not exceeding 63 inches in length, shall be deemed Clap Boards, and be charged with duty accordingly.
Page 14 - Colony, and was done by Nicholas Clark the first winter that any Englishman rought or built in Hartford, which was in the year 1635. " My father and mother and his family came to Hartford in the year 1636, and lived first in said kitchen which was first on the west side of the chimney. " The great Barn was built in the year 1636, and undcrpined in the year 1637, and was the first barn that was raised in tliis-colony.
Page 198 - Plastering, for drawing and carrying water, scaffolding, lathing, laying and finishing the plastering, provideing, and paying his laborer, haeving the lime, clay, sand, hayre, hay with materialls for scaffolding layd neare the place. By the yeard for seeling 4-ob, for the side walls, being whole or in great paines 4d, betwixt the studs, the studs not measured, 5d-ob. rendering betwixt the studs 2d.
Page 225 - Increase Mather, An Essay for the Recording of Illustrious Providences (Boston, 1684), 39-57 passim.
Page 98 - Eaton built his house on the spot which is now the north corner of Elm and Orange streets. It was built in the form of a capital E, was large and lofty, and had 21 fire places.
Page 176 - The rocks at the northern and principal opening, according to tradition, originally hung shelving over the river. They were used for building stone very soon after Middletown was settled. At a meeting held in that town in 1665, it was resolved that no one should dig or raise stones at the rocks on the east side of the river, but an inhabitant of Middletown, and that twelve pence should be paid to the town for every ton of stones taken. As early as this, they were transported in vessels to other places.
Page 14 - L, p. 263. the house that I live in was the first house that my father built in Hartford, in Conn. Colony, and was done by Nicholas Clark, the first winter that any Englishman rought or built in Hartford, which was in the year 1635.
Page 14 - The great barn was built in the year 1636, and underpined in 1637, and was the first barn that was raised in the colony. The east side of this house that we live in, and was my father Talcott's, deceased, was built with the porch that is, in the year 1638, and the chimneys were built in 1638.

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