Lessons in Elocution, Or, A Selection of Pieces in Prose and Verse: For the Improvement of Youth in Reading and Speaking (Google eBook)

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Ezra Collier, 1825 - Elocution - 372 pages
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Contents

Tho sick Iron he fox and the wolf ibid
59
Dishonesty punished Kanes Hints ib 12 The picture ibid
60
The two bees Dodsleys Fables ib 14 Beauty and deformity Percivals Tales CI
63
Avarice and luxury Spectator
64
Hercules choice Tattler
65
Will Honeycombs Spectator Spectator
67
On Good breeding Chesterfield
70
Address to a young student Knox
73
Advantages of and motives to cheerfulness Spectator
75
SECTION II
79
Respect due to old age Spectator ib 3 Piety to God recommended to the young Blair
80
Modesty and docility
81
Sincerity Hid ib 6 Benevolence and humanity ibid
82
Industry and application iud
83
Proper employment of time ibid
84
The true patriot Art of Thinking
85
Needlework recommended to the ladies ibid
88
On pride Guardian
90
Journal of the life of Alexander Severus Gibbon
92
On mispent time Guardian
94
Character of Francis I Robertson
97
Tiie supper and grace Sterne
100
Rustic felicity jiid
102
The honour and advantage of a constant adherence to truth Percivals Tales
104
Impertinence in discourse Theopkrastus ib 3 Character of Addison as a writer Johnson
105
Pleasure and pain Spectator
106
Sir Roger de Coverlys family ibid
108
The folly of inconsistent expectations Aitken
110
Description of the vale of Keswick in Cumberland Brown
112
Pity an Allegory Aitken
115
Advantages of commerce Spectator
116
On public speaking ibid
118
Advantages of history Hume
120
On the immortality of the soul Spectator
122
The combat of the Horatii and the Curiatii Limy
124
On the power of custom Spectator
126
On pedantry Mirror
128
The journey of a daya picture of human life Rambler
130
SECTION IV
133
Reflections in Westminster Abbey Spectator
134
The character of Mary queen of Scots Robertson
137
The character of queen Elizabeth Hume
138
Charles Vs resignation of his dominions Robertson
140
Importance of virtue Price
143
Address to art Harris
144
Flattery Theopkrastus
146
The absent man Spectator
147
TO The Monk Sterne
148
On the headdress of the ladies Spectator
150
On the present and future state ibid
153
Uncle Tobys benevolence Sterne
155
Story of the siege of Calais Fool of quality
156
m
160
On the structure of animals Spectator
161
On natural and fantastical pleasures Guardian
164
The folly and madness of ambition illustrated World
168
Battle of Pharsalia and the death of Pompey Goldsmith
176
Awkwardness in company Chesterfield
177
Virtue mans highest interest Harris ib 9 On the pleasure arising from objects of sight Spectator
179
Liberty and slavery Sterne
181
The toilet ibid
198
The hermit Parnell ib 9 On the death of Mrs Mason Mason
203
ExtraC from the temple of fame Pope ib 11 A panegyric on Great Britain Thjtmson
205
Hymn to the Deity on the seasons of the year ibid
207
SECTION VII
210
On the order of nature Pope
211
Description of a country alehouse Goldsmith
212
Character of a country schoolmaster ibid ib 5 Story of Palemon and Lavinia Thomson
213
Celadon and Amelia ibid
216
Description of Mab queen of the Faries Shakespeare
217
On the existence of a Deity Young ib 9 Evening in Paradise described Milton
218
Elegy written in a country churchyard Gray
220
Scipio restoring the captive lady to her lover Thomson
222
Humorous complaint to Dr Arbuthnot of the impertinence of scribblers Pope
224
Hymn to adversity Gray
225
The passionsAn ode Collins
226
SECTION VIII
228
LAIIegro or the merry man ibid
229
On the pursuits of mankind Pope
231
Adnm and Eves morning hymn Milton
233
Parting of Hector and Andromache Homer 834
234
Facetious history of John Gilpin Cowper
237
The creation of the world Milton
242
Overthrow of the rebel angels ibid
243
Alexanders feast or the power of music Dryden
244
On truth and integrity Tillotson
247
On happiness Sterne
253
SECTION II
259
SECTION III
268
SECTION IV
276
Publius Scipio to the Roman army ibid
282
Canuleius to the Roman consuls Hooke
290
Jupiter to the inferior deities Homer
298
DIALOGUES
306
Boniface and Aimwell Beaux Stratagem
311
Lovegold and Lappet Miser
313
Cardinal Wolsey and Cromwell Henry VIII
317
Sir Charles and Lady Racket Three Weeks after Marriage
320
Brutus and Cassius Shakespeares Julius Casr
323
Hamlets advice to the players Tragedy of Hamlet
326
Douglasaccount of himself Tragedy of Douglas
327
the hermit ibid
328
Setrrpronius speech for war Tragedy of Cato ib 5 Lucius speech for peace ibid
329
Hotspurs account of the fop 1 Henry the IV ib 7 soliloquy on the contents of a letter ibid
330
Othellos apology for his marriage Tragedy of Othello
331
Henry IVs soliloquy on sleep 2 Henry the IV
332
Soliloquy of Hamlets uncle on the murder of his brother Tragedy of Hamlet
333
Soliloquy of Hamlet on death ibid
334
Falstaffs encomiums on sack 2 Henry the IV
335
Prologue to the tragedy of Cato Pope ib 15 Catos soliloquy on the immortality of the squL Tragedy of Cato
336
Lady Randolphs soliloquy Tragedy of Douglas
337
before the battle of Agincourt ibid
338
Soliloquy of Dick the apprentice Farce of the Apprentice
339
Cassius instigating Brutus to join the conspiracy against Csesar Tragedy of Julius Caesar
340
Brutus harangue on the death of Caesar ibid
341
Antonys oration over Caesars body ibid
342
Falstaffs soliloquy on honour Henry IV
344
The world compared to a stage 4s you like it ib APPENDIXContaining concise lessons on a new plan
346
Rules for pronouncing Greek and Latin proper names Walker
361
Pronunciation of Greek and Latin names ibid
365

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 188 - Whilst all the stars that round her burn, And all the planets in their turn, Confirm the tidings as they roll, And spread the truth from pole to pole.
Page 332 - And you, good yeomen, Whose limbs were made in England, show us here The mettle of your pasture; let us swear That you are worth your breeding, which I doubt not; For there is none of you so mean and base, ) That hath not noble lustre in your eyes. I see you stand like greyhounds in the slips, Straining upon the start. The game's afoot! Follow your spirit, and upon this charge Cry, "God for Harry! England and Saint George!
Page 335 - Who is here so base that would be a bondman ? If any, speak, for him have I offended. Who is here so rude that would not be a Roman? If any, speak, for him have I offended. Who is here so...
Page 339 - With eyes severe, and beard of formal cut, Full of wise saws and modern instances, And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts Into the...
Page 324 - Was parmaceti for an inward bruise ; And that it was great pity, so it was, This villanous salt-petre should be digg'd Out of the bowels of the harmless earth, Which many a good tall fellow had destroy'd So cowardly ; and but for these vile guns, He would himself have been a soldier.
Page 192 - And decks the goddess with the glittering spoil. This casket India's glowing gems unlocks, And all Arabia breathes from yonder box. The tortoise here and elephant unite, Transform'd to combs, the speckled and the white. Here files of pins extend their shining rows, Puffs, powders, patches, bibles, billets-doux.
Page 224 - To hear the lark begin his flight And singing startle the dull night From his watch-tower in the skies, Till the dappled dawn doth rise; Then to come, in spite of sorrow, And at my window bid good-morrow Through the sweetbriar, or the vine, Or the twisted eglantine : While the cock with lively din Scatters the rear of darkness thin, And to the stack, or the barn-door, Stoutly struts his dames before...
Page 215 - Muse, The place of fame and elegy supply: And many a holy text around she strews, That teach the rustic moralist to die. For who, to dumb Forgetfulness a prey, This pleasing anxious being e'er...
Page 326 - Wilt thou upon the high and giddy mast Seal up the ship-boy's eyes, and rock his brains In cradle of the rude imperious surge ; And in the visitation of the winds, "Who take the ruffian billows by the top, Curling their monstrous heads, and hanging them With deaf'ning clamours in the slippery clouds, That, with the hurly * death itself awakes...
Page 225 - And ever, against eating cares, Lap me in soft Lydian airs, Married to immortal verse, Such as the meeting soul may pierce, In notes with many a winding bout Of linked sweetness long drawn out 140 With wanton heed and giddy cunning, The melting voice through mazes running, Untwisting all the chains that tie The hidden soul of harmony ; That Orpheus...

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