The History of England: From the Invasion of Julius Cęsar, to the Revolution in 1688, Volume 10, Volume 10

Front Cover
Plain Label Books, 2010 - History - 566 pages
4 Reviews
This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.
  

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Review: The History of England, 6 Vols

User Review  - Brendan - Goodreads

Vol. 5 (...now I HAVE to read the 5 other volumes) A complex, exhausting compendium of conjectural history, philosophy, and humanist sensibilities. This is a triumphant feat. To read the life and ... Read full review

Review: The History of England, 6 Vols

User Review  - Richard Epstein - Goodreads

The best history of England ever written by a great philosopher. Go ahead, read it. You'll be a better person for it. And even if you're not, think how saying you read it will impress your next date from christianmingle.com. Read full review

Contents

I
27
II
100
III
171
IV
172
V
245
VI
285
VII
346
VIII
373
XI
442
XII
502
XIII
503
XIV
556
XV
557
XVI
599
XVII
600
XVIII
668

IX
418
X
441
XIX
718

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 10 - In spring, 1775, I was struck with a disorder in my bowels, which at first gave me no alarm, but has since, as I apprehend it, become mortal and incurable. I now reckon upon a speedy dissolution. I have suffered very little pain from my disorder; and what is more strange have, notwithstanding the great decline of my...
Page 9 - ... formerly known in England; I was become not only independent, but opulent. I retired to my native country of Scotland, determined never more to set my foot out of it; and retaining the satisfaction of never having preferred a request to one great man, or even making advances of friendship to any of them.
Page 30 - The religion of the Britons was one of the most considerable parts of their government, and the Druids, who were their priests, possessed great authority among them. Besides ministering at the altar and directing all religious duties, they presided over the education of youth ; they...
Page 20 - ... disagreeable source of what is called wit in other men. It never was the meaning of his raillery to mortify ; and therefore, far from offending, it seldom failed to please and delight, even those who were the objects of it. To his friends, who were frequently the objects of it, there was not perhaps any one of all his great and amiable qualities, which contributed more to endear his conversation. And that...
Page 127 - The merit of this prince, both in private and public life, may, with advantage, be set in opposition to that of any monarch or citizen, which the annals of any age, or any nation, can present to us. He seems, indee"d, to be the complete model of that perfect character, which, under the denomination of a sage or wise man, the philosophers have, been fond of delineating...
Page 7 - Mr. Millar told me that in a twelvemonth he sold only forty-five copies of it. I scarcely, indeed, heard of one man in the three kingdoms, considerable for rank or letters, that could endure the book.
Page 127 - Nature also, as if desirous that so bright a production of her skill should be set in the fairest light, had...
Page 20 - And that gaiety of temper, so agreeable in society, but which is so often accompanied with frivolous and superficial qualities, was in him certainly attended with the most severe application, the most extensive learning, the greatest depth of thought, and a capacity in every respect the most comprehensive. Upon the whole, I have always considered him, both in his lifetime and since his death, as approaching as nearly to the idea of a perfectly wise and virtuous man as perhaps the nature of human...
Page 7 - I confess, discouraged; and had not the war been at that time breaking out between France and England, I had certainly retired to some provincial town of the former kingdom, have changed my name, and never more have returned to my native country.
Page 146 - ... that a merchant, who had made three long sea voyages on his own account, should be admitted to the rank of a thane or gentleman.

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