Following the Color Line: An Account of Negro Citizenship in the American Democracy (Google eBook)

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Doubleday, Page, 1908 - African Americans - 314 pages
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Page 157 - In a wee wooden schoolhouse. something put it into the boys' and girls' heads to buy gorgeous visiting,cards ten cents a package and exchange. The exchange was merry. till one girl. a tall newcomer. refused my card. refused it peremptorily. with a glance. Then it dawned upon me with a certain suddenness that I was different from the others; or like. mayhap. in heart and life and longing. but shut out from their world by a vast veil.
Page 157 - In a wee wooden schoolhouse, something put it into the boys' and girls' heads to buy gorgeous visiting-cards ten cents a package and exchange. The exchange was merry, till one girl, a tall newcomer, refused my card refused it peremptorily, with a glance. Then it dawned upon me with a certain suddenness that I was different from the others; or like, mayhap, in heart and life and longing, but shut out from their world by a vast veil. I had thereafter no desire to tear down that veil, to...
Page 157 - With other black boys the strife was not so fiercely sunny: their youth shrunk into tasteless sycophancy, or into silent hatred of the pale world about them and mocking distrust of everything white; or wasted it self in a bitter cry, Why did God make me an outcast and a stranger in mine own house?
Page 38 - Negroes often refuse to turn over a criminal of their color to white justice; it is like the instinctive clannishness of the Highland Scotch or the peasant Irish. I don't know how many southern people have told me in different ways of how extremely difficult it is to get at the real feeling of a Negro, to make him tell what goes on in his clubs and churches or in his innumerable societies.
Page 157 - The shades of the prisonhouse closed round about us all: walls strait and stubborn to the whitest, but relentlessly narrow, tall, and unscalable to sons of night who must plod darkly on in resignation, or beat unavailing palms against the stone, or steadily, half hopelessly, watch the streak of blue above.
Page 81 - I saw it even-where was the way in which the white people were torn between their feeling of race prejudice and their downright economic needs. Hating and fearing the Negro as a race (though often loving individual Negroes), they yet want him to work for them; they can't get along without him. In one impulse a community will rise to mob Negroes or to drive them out of the country because of Negro crime or Negro vagrancy, or because the Negro is becoming educated, acquiring property and "getting...
Page 39 - Baker drew the conclusion, after observing the Negro's deliberate secretiveness, that this was a major source of deteriorating race relations. The Negro has long been defensively secretive. Slavery made him that. In the past, the instinct was passive and defensive; but with growing education and intelligent leadership it is rapidly becoming conscious, self-directive and offensive. And right there, it seems to me, lies the great cause of the increased strain in the...
Page 253 - The independents in the South have to face the same state of affairs that the independents of the North did in the '80's all the better traditions connected with one party, and most of the respectable people belonging to the same party. Just as George William Curtis and his followers were accused of being democrats in disguise and of being traitors to the "grand old party" that had saved the Union and freed the slaves, and deserters to a party of Copperheads, so the Southern independent is said...
Page 284 - We insist upon such an equitable distribution of the school funds that all the youth of the negro race shall have at least an opportunity to receive the elementary education provided by the State...
Page 15 - 11. Wild rumors of a larger number killed have no foundation that we can discover. As the city was paying for funeral expenses of victims, and relief was given their families, they had every motive to make known their loss.

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