Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (Google eBook)

Front Cover
C. Scribner's Sons, 1886 - London (England) - 138 pages
13 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
3
4 stars
5
3 stars
3
2 stars
1
1 star
1

Review: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

User Review  - Katalina - Goodreads

I was reading a little bit different book and it is named Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson Illustrated Chosen Classics Retold. But I think if the name of bouth are similar, the plot ... Read full review

Review: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

User Review  - Julia Courlas - Goodreads

It's a Frankenstein-esque story. It was a quick read for me and I enjoyed it, but I must say I like other books of this gothic - "scientific experimental" nature better than this. Read full review

Contents

I
1
II
14
III
30
IV
35
V
44
VI
53
VII
61
VIII
65
IX
89
X
104

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 101 - He put the glass to his lips, and drank at one gulp. A cry followed; he reeled, staggered, clutched at the table and held on, staring with injected eyes, gasping with open mouth; and as I looked there came, I thought, a change he seemed to swell his face became suddenly black and the features seemed to melt and alter and the next moment I had sprung to my feet and leaped back against the wall, my arm raised to shield me from that prodigy, my mind submerged in terror. "O God!
Page 128 - I sat in the sun on a bench; the animal within me licking the chops of memory; the spiritual side a little drowsed, promising subsequent penitence, but not yet moved to begin. After all, I reflected, I was like my neighbours; and then I smiled, comparing myself with other men, comparing my active goodwill with the lazy cruelty of their neglect.
Page 145 - This preservation photocopy was made and hand bound at BookLab, Inc. in compliance with copyright law. The paper, Weyerhaeuser Cougar Opaque Natural, meets the requirements of ANSI/NISO Z39.48-1992 (Permanence of Paper).
Page 104 - And indeed the worst of my faults was a certain impatient gaiety of disposition, such as has made the happiness of many, but such as I found it hard to reconcile with my imperious desire to carry my head high, and wear a more than commonly grave countenance before the public. Hence it came about that I concealed my pleasures; and that when I reached years of reflection, and began to look round me and take stock of my progress and position in the world, I stood already committed to a profound duplicity...
Page 107 - I told myself, could but be housed in separate identities, life would be relieved of all that was unbearable; the unjust might go his way, delivered from the aspirations and remorse of his more upright twin; and the just could walk steadfastly and securely on his upward path, doing the good things in which he found his pleasure, and no longer exposed to disgrace and penitence by the hands of this extraneous evil.
Page 129 - A moment before I had been safe of all men's respect, wealthy, beloved the cloth laying for me in the dining-room at home; and now I was the common quarry of mankind, hunted, houseless, a known murderer, thrall to the gallows.
Page 105 - Though so profound a double-dealer, I was in no sense a hypocrite; both sides of me were in dead earnest; I was no more myself when I laid aside restraint and plunged in shame, than when I laboured, in the eye of day, at the furtherance of knowledge or the relief of sorrow and suffering.
Page 106 - With every day, and from both sides of my intelligence, the moral and the intellectual, I thus drew steadily nearer to that truth, by whose partial discovery I have been doomed to such a dreadful shipwreck : that man is not truly one, but truly two.
Page 25 - Round the corner from the by-street there was a square of ancient, handsome houses, now for the most part decayed from their high estate, and let in flats and chambers to all sorts and conditions of men: mapengravers, architects, shady lawyers, and the agents of obscure enterprises.
Page 6 - ... at last I got into that state of mind when a man listens and listens and begins to long for the sight of a policeman. All at once, I saw two figures: one a little man who was stumping along eastward at a good walk, and the other a girl of maybe eight or ten who was running as hard as she was able down a cross street.

Bibliographic information