Douglas Jerrold's Shilling Magazine, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Douglas William Jerrold
Punch Office, 1845
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Contains Douglas Jerrold's novel St. Giles and St. James (selected issues, no. 1-29), illustrated by Leech.
  

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Page 85 - O eloquent, just, and mighty Death \ whom none could advise, thou hast persuaded ; what none hath dared, thou hast done ; and whom all the world hath flattered, thou only hast cast out of the world and despised ; thou hast drawn together all the far-stretched greatness, all the pride, cruelty, and ambition of man, and covered it all over with these two narrow words, Hie jacet...
Page 340 - Dis's waggon! daffodils That come before the swallow dares, and take The winds of March with beauty; violets dim, But sweeter than the lids of Juno's eyes Or Cytherea's breath; pale primroses, That die unmarried, ere they can behold Bright Phoebus in his strength...
Page 532 - Let a man be what he will, when he comes here, he is soon as bad as the rest ; a man's heart is taken from him, and there is given to him the heart of a beast.
Page 186 - Here is the difference betwixt the poet and the mystic, that the last nails a symbol to one sense, which was a true sense for a moment, but soon becomes old and false. For all symbols are fluxional; all language is vehicular and transitive, and is good, as ferries and horses are, for conveyance, not as farms and houses are, for homestead.
Page 219 - Nay, take my life and all; pardon not that: You take my house, when you do take the prop That doth sustain my house; you take my life, When you do take the means whereby I live.
Page 91 - REYNARD THE FOX : A renowned Apologue of the Middle Age. Reproduced in Rhyme. Embellished throughout with Scroll Capitals, in Colours, from Wood-block Letters made expressly for this work, after Designs of the 12th and 13th Centuries.
Page 84 - ... happiness. He takes the account of the rich, and proves him a beggar, a naked beggar, which hath interest in nothing but in the gravel that fills his mouth. He holds a glass before the eyes of the most beautiful, and makes them see therein their deformity and rottenness, and they acknowledge It.
Page 177 - Sir, had you not better have a glass of water ?' Upon which he, much out of humour, said with an oath : ' No. I will go directly to the Queen :
Page 493 - When the merry bells ring round, And the jocund rebecks sound To many a youth and many a maid, Dancing in the chequer'd shade...
Page 83 - ... said by many, that I might have been more pleasing to the Reader, if I had written the Story of mine own times; having been permitted to draw water as near the Well-head as another.

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