The Polite Miscellany: Containing Variety of Food for the Mind; Being an Elegant Collection of Moral, Humourous, and Improving Essays, &c, Both in Prose and Verse ... (Google eBook)

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R. Whitworth, 1764 - English essays - 370 pages
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Page 203 - King, upon the commencement of the last war with France pulled down his old sign, and put up the Queen of Hungary. Under the influence of her red face and golden sceptre, he continued to sell ale till she was no longer the favourite of his customers; he changed her, therefore, some time ago, for the King of Prussia, who may probably be changed in turn for the next great man that shall be set up for vulgar admiration.
Page 114 - Ye mute Companions of my Toils, that bear In all my Griefs a more than equal Share!
Page 176 - By lust incited, or by malice led, The villain Arab ! as he prowls for prey, Oft marks with blood and...
Page 121 - ... more thought, memory, and application to be fools, than would serve to make them wise and useful. When I reflect on this, I cannot conceive you to be human creatures, but a...
Page 114 - What if the lion in his rage I meet ! Oft in the dust I view his printed feet: And, fearful ! oft, when day's declining light Yields her pale empire to the mourner night, By hunger...
Page 232 - Griping misers, nightly waking, See the end of all your care ; Fled on wings of our own making, We have left our owners bare.
Page 205 - ... the crowd behind them to look on. The crowd takes them at their word. Patriot, philosopher, and poet, are shouted in their train. Where was there ever so much merit seen ; no times so important as our own ; ages yet unborn shall gaze with wonder and applause...
Page 103 - Grac'd with soft arts, the peopled world around ! The morn that lights you to your loves...
Page 17 - Till thou hast bless'd their memory, and paid Those thanks which God appointed the reward Of public virtue. And if chance thy home Salute thee with a father's honour'd name, Go, call thy sons; instruct them what a debt They owe their ancestors; and make them swear To pay it, by transmitting down entire Those sacred rights to which themselves were born.
Page 287 - Little do such men know the toil, the pains, The daily, nightly racking of the brains, To range the thoughts, the matter to digest, To cull fit phrases, and reject the rest...

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