The improved coaster's guide, and Marine board examination, for the east coast of England and Scotland, and the English channell (Google eBook)

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1844
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Page 198 - At the request of persons extensively engaged in tuition, JG has introduced his WARRANTED SCHOOL AND PUBLIC PENS, which are especially adapted to their use, being of different degrees of flexibility, and with fine, medium, and broad points, suitable for the various kinds of Writing taught in Schools. Sold Retail by all Stationers, Booksellers, and other respectable Dealers in Steel Pens.
Page 169 - To lunar observations, however, is joined the use of timekeepers, which serve in the intervals during which observations of the distance of the moon from the sun, or from a star, cannot be obtained. These instruments would alone accomplish the end proposed, if it were possible to construct them with such accuracy, that when once regulated to the time under a given meridian, their motion would remain exactly the same during the whole continuance of the voyage ; for they would then at all times point...
Page 169 - ... of a degree in its position, corresponds to a little less than 2' of time, or 30' of a degree in longitude. Now, by help of the very accurate instruments which we now possess, we can, by taking the angular distance of the moon from a star,- or from the sun, ascertain with great precision the position of that body, and consequently can determine within a few seconds what hour it is, under a given meridian, at the moment of observation. This method, denominated that of lunar distances, which was...
Page 136 - Head, the shore is principally cliff, and composed for the most part of chalk, its elevation and chalky appearance continuing as far as Old Harry, where it again abruptly declines. Throughout Christchurch Bay the land is generally low, and still more so in the vicinity of Hurst Castle, the base of which is very little elevated above the level of the sea. From thence the western end of the Isle of Wight, the Needle Point, rises perpendicularly, and being composed wholly of chalk becomes very remarkable,...
Page v - This buoy lies in two fathoms at low water spring tides, and with the following marks and compass bearings, viz : Cemaes Mill i point open cast of the beacon on Harry's Furlong, SE J S.
Page 153 - For the purposes of Navigation it may be considered as perfectly so. It revolves round one of its diameters, called the axis, in about twenty-four hours.
Page 163 - ... make the contact of the limbs of these objects as perfect as possible at the wire nearest the plane of the instrument ; fix the index in this position; move the sextant till the objects are at the other wire, and if the same limbs are in contact the axis is adjusted ; but if the limbs are either apparently separated, or partly cover each other, correct half the error by the screws in the circular part of the supporter, one of which is above, and the other between the telescope and sextant ; turn...
Page 175 - C, as seen above, are constants, depending upon the latitude of the place of observation and the declination of the star. Tables for these quantities will be found in an appendix to Annual Report US Coast and Geodetic Survey for 1874.
Page 173 - ... proportion as the circles of longitude come near each other; and at the point where all these circles, till then convergent, cut each other, that is, at the pole there is no more longitude. The reckoning of the latitudes begins at the equator. This commencement is naturally determined by the circumstances of the earth's motion. It is otherwise with the longitude ; for all the meridians being great circles, nature furnishes no motive for choosing one in preference to any other, as a term from...
Page 201 - Best Medicine in the World! 30,000 Boxes Sold Weekly. The fine balsamic and invigorating powers of this Medicine are truly wonderful ; a trial of a single dose will carry a conviction that they are all that is necessary to invigorate the feeble, restore the invalid to health, and do good in all cases. In their operation they go direct to the disease. After you have taken six or twelve pills you will experience their good effect the disease upon you will become less and...

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