Prairie City: The Story of an American Community

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University of Oklahoma Press, Sep 1, 1998 - History - 254 pages
2 Reviews

Prairie City is the social history of a representative midwestern town - a composite of several Oklahoma small towns. Beginning with the "one flashing moment" of the 1889 land run, which opened the "Oklahoma Lands" for white settlement, Angie Debo depicts the struggles of the settlers on the vast prairie to build a community despite seasons of drought, prairie fire, and destitution. Solidly based on historical research, Prairie City chronicles the arrival of the railroad, the growth of political parties and educational institutions, KKK uprisings, the oil boom, the Depression and the New Deal, and the effects of two world wars on small-town America.

  

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Review: Prairie City: The Story of an American Community

User Review  - Scott Freeman - Goodreads

I feel that this book failed on both fronts. It was not compelling enough to be a quality history nor was it riveting enough to sustain interest as a fictional story. Fictionalizing what should have been an OK history textbook did not work for me. Read full review

Review: Prairie City: The Story of an American Community

User Review  - Jessie Harvey - Goodreads

This books marks my love and commitment to my temporary Oklahoma home. Read full review

Contents

STAKING THE CLAIM
3
THE LITTLE STORE IN THE WILDERNESS
4
BUILDING A GOVERNMENT
13
A SOCIETY IN THE MAKING
23
THE OLDTIME RELIGION
31
THE RUN INTO THE CHEROKEE STRIP
40
PRAIRIE CITY FEELS A BOOM
50
THE ECONOMIC BASIS
59
THE MAGIC OF STATEHOOD
120
THE PEACEFUL YEARS
130
OVER THERE
150
THE SHEETED TERROR
163
NEVER AGAIN
173
PLOWING GOLD
184
THE WEAKEST LINK
197
THE DEPRESSION YEARS
206

THE PEOPLE COME TO TOWN
66
THE PASSING OF THE PIONEER ERA
78
THE COMING OF THE RAILROAD
91
CITY WAYS
98
THE SHOCK OF TRAGEDY
109
PRAIRIE CITY GAMBLES WITH ITS FUTURE
115
THE RULES ARE CHANGED
215
THE DOLDRUMS
228
PEARL HARBOR
236
Index I
247
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

Angie Debo was reared in a pioneer community, at Marshall, Oklahoma, where it has been her privilege to know from childhood the folkways of the Indians and the traditions of the western settlers. A member of her community high school's first graduating class, she later attended the University of Oklahoma, where she was a Phi Beta Kappa, and took her B.A. and later her Ph.D. degree; she received her master's degree from the University of Chicago. Her education was combined with intervals of teaching in country schools, starting at the age of sixteen.Miss Debo's distinguished reputation as a regional scholar has been enhanced by her book, The Rise and. Fall of the Choctaw Republic, which won the John H. Dunning prize of the American Historical Society for the best book submitted in the field of United States history in 1934, and for her later, book, And Still the Waters Run. She has been a teacher in schools and colleges both in Oklahoma and Texas and was curator of the Panhandle-Plains Historical Museum in Canyon, Texas. More recently she has been state director of the Federal Writers' Project in Oklahoma, in which capacity she edited Oklahoma: A Guide to the Sooner State for the American Guide Series.

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