The armies of industry: our nation's manufacture of munitions for a world in arms, 1917-1918, Volume 4, Part 1 (Google eBook)

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Yale university press, 1921 - Defense industries
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Contents

I
342
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354
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365

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Page xviii - The representatives of Great Britain and France state that their production of artillery— field, medium, and heavy— Is now established on so large a scale that they are able to equip completely all American divisions as they arrive in France during the year 1918 with the best make of British and French suns and howitzers. With a view, therefore, to expedite and facilitate the equipment of the American armies in France, and, second, to securing the maximum ultimate development of the munitions...
Page 19 - To give such an organization, the leading principles in its formation ought to be, that, at the commencement of hostilities, there should be nothing either to new model or to create. The only difference, consequently, between the peace and the war formation of the Army ought to be in the increased magnitude of the latter; and the only change in passing from the former to the latter, should consist in giving to it the augmentation which will then be necessary.
Page 375 - ... engines, aeroplanes and their numerous accessories are constantly being worked out. But the interval between the discovery of an improvement and its introduction into the service is, owing to technical considerations, very much longer than is commonly supposed. Experience shows that, as a rule, from the date of the conception and design of an aero-engine to the delivery of the first engine in series by the manufacturer, more than a year elapses; the corresponding period for an aeroplane is about...
Page xix - French guns and howitzers. The British and French ammunition supply and reserves are sufficient to provide the requirements of the American Army thus equipped at least up to June, 1918, provided that the existing 6-inch shell plants in the United States and Dominion of Canada are maintained in full activity, and provided that the manufacture of 6-inch howitzer carriages in the United States is to some extent sufficiently developed. On the other hand, the French, and to a lesser extent the British,...
Page xix - France, and, second, to secure the maximum ultimate development of the ammunition supply with the minimum strain upon available tonnage, the representatives of Great Britain and France propose that the American field, medium, and heavy artillery be supplied during 1918, and as long after as may be found convenient, from British and French gun factories...
Page 274 - ... in itself an enterprise of no mean proportions. Some seven different types of mortars were in use when we came into the war. Our ordnance program contemplated the manufacture of all seven of them, but we actually succeeded in bringing only four types into production. These four were the British Newton-Stokes mortars of the 3-inch, 4-inch, and 6-inch calibers, and the French 240millimeter mortar, which had also been adopted by the British. As usual in the adoption of foreign devices, we had to...
Page 372 - Rolls-Royce, Hall-Scott, Curtiss, and Renault. Crank case: A box section carrying the shaft in bearings clamped between the top and bottom halves by means of long through bolts, as in the Mercedes and Hispano-Suiza. Lubrication: The system of lubrication was changed, this being the only change of design made in the Liberty after it was first put down on paper. The original system combined the features of a dry crank case, such as in the Rolls-Royce, with pressure feed to the main crank-shaft bearings...
Page 61 - ... Thus the pulling power of the horse coupled with his speed has been the limiting factor in the design and weight of mobile field artillery. As one of our foremost United States ordnance engineers once said, "the limited power of the horse is what has governed the weight of our artillery," and that "if Divine Providence had given the horse the speed of the deer and the power of the elephant, we might have had a far wider and more effective range for our mobile artillery.
Page 235 - September 10, and Ilion about October 28. The progress in the manufacture was thereafter steadily upward. During the week ending February 2, 1918, the daily production of military rifles in the United States was 9,247, of which 7,805 were modified Enfields produced in the three private plants, and 1,442 were Springfields built in the two arsenals. The total production for that week was 50,873 guns of both types, or nearly enough for three Army divisions. In spite of the time that went into the standardization...
Page 335 - ... dope" with which the airplane wings are covered and made airtight. An airplane must have wings and an engine, with a propeller to make it go; and, like a bird, it must have a tail to make it fly straight and a body (fuselage) to hold all together. Part of the tail (the rudder) moves sidewise and steers the airplane from left to right; part (the elevators) moves up and down and makes the airplane go up or down; and parts of the wings (the ailerons) move up and down and make the airplane tip from...

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