A Dictionary of chemistry and the allied branches of other sciences, Volume 4 (Google eBook)

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Longmans, Green, and Company, 1868
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Page 108 - It is sparingly soluble in water, but mixes in all proportions with alcohol and ether. It burns with difficulty...
Page 301 - ozone to be a compound of oxygen with oxygen, and the contraction to be consequent upon their combination, then, if one portion of this combined or contracted oxygen were absorbed by the re-agent, the other portion would be set free, and by its liberation might expand to the volume of the whole. Thus, if we suppose three volumes of oxygen to be condensed by their mutual combination into two volumes, then, on absorbing one-third of this combined oxygen by mercury, the remaining two-thirds would be...
Page 389 - Crystallised salicylic acid is strongly and quickly heated in a glass retort either alone or mixed with pounded glass or quicklime. Phenol then passes into the receiver and crystallises on cooling almost to the last drop.
Page 104 - ... organisation and vitality of the part. It forms insoluble compounds with many kinds of animal matter, and is employed to remove it from solution. When organic substances, to which a solution of nitrate of silver has been applied, are exposed to light, they become black from the reduction of the oxide of silver to the metallic state. A solution of nitrate of silver in ether is employed to dye the hair black. One part of nitrate of silver and 4 parts of gum arabic dissolved in 4 parts of water,...
Page 499 - ... at the bottom ; these tubes being arranged in a funnel, and the funnel inserted into a bottle which stands in a dish containing water. The whole arrangement is covered with a bell-jar, but in such a manner as to give access to the external air, which, however, should not be very warm.
Page 328 - ... chloride of potassium, and evaporated to dryness. A dark saline mass is thus obtained, consisting of chloride of potassium, chloride of copper and potassium, and chloride of palladium and potassium; and on treating this mass with alcohol of specific gravity 0-833, the two former salts are dissolved and the double chloride of palladium and potassium remains (Berzolius).
Page 465 - ... distils over, whilst a viscid oil remains behind, which gradually solidifies with a crystalline structure. Washing with cold alcohol and two or three crystallizations from boiling alcohol render this body perfectly white and pure, a very soluble substance of a magnificent crimson colour remaining in solution. The portion of the black mass which is insoluble in water dissolves almost entirely in dilute hydrochloric acid, from which solution it is reprecipitated by the alkalies in the form of an...
Page 297 - It forms eight-ninths of water, nearly oue-fonrth of the air, and about one-half of silica, chalk, and alumina, the three most plentiful constituents of the earth's surface. With a few exceptions only, of which the principal are rock-salt, fluor-spar, blende, galena, and pyrites, it enters into the constitution of all important rocks and minerals. Independently of its existence in the water of the tissues, it is an essential constituent of all living organisms. It is absorbed by animals during respiration,...
Page 182 - India nut, as all of them assume a pale rose colour; but when poppy is mixed with olive or castor oils, there is a decrease in the consistency of the semi-saponified matter. By the aid of the above reagents we can also ascertain the presence of 10 per cent, of...
Page 475 - ... disappears, and is replaced by that of hydrocyanic acid, and crystals are gradually deposited. In order to obtain the new compound in sufficient quantity, it is best to keep up a continuous slow current of cyanogen, by which means crystals are deposited during the action in considerable abundance. These are collected on a filter, and washed with a small quantity of alcohol ; and the filtrate, on being again exposed to the action of cyanogen, yields an additional quantity of crystals inferior...

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