Exploring Chaos: A Guide to the New Science of Disorder

Front Cover
Nina Hall
W. W. Norton & Company, 1994 - Science - 223 pages
2 Reviews
In the past few years, a new line of scientific inquiry called "chaos theory" has caught the popular imagination. Young people, in particular, have taken to the complex computer-generated patterns that seem to teeter precariously between order and randomness. A dazzling mathematical object, the Mandelbrot set, now decorates posters, record sleeves, and pop videos (as well as the back cover of this book jacket). Chaos theory, it turns out, has a deeper meaning for our understanding of nature. All sorts of phenomena - from dripping faucets to swinging pendulums, from the unpredictability of the weather to the majestic parade of the planets, from heart rhythms to gold futures - are best perceived through the mathematical prism of chaos theory. In this collection of incisive, front-line reports, ably edited by Nina Hall for New Scientist magazine, internationally recognized experts such as Ian Stewart, Robert May, and Benoit Mandelbrot draw on the latest research to explain the roots of chaos in modern science and mathematics.
  

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Review: Exploring Chaos: A Guide to the New Science of Disorder

User Review  - Cathy Pedler - Goodreads

Read for grad class. Good intro in the mid 1990s. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - fpagan - LibraryThing

(See Kellert.) Collection of 18 articles that appeared in New Scientist magazine. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
7
Chaos in the swing of a pendulum
22
An experiment with mathematics
33
Portraits of chaos
44
Turbulent times for fluids
59
A weather eye on unpredictability
69
The chaotic rhythms of life
82
Is the Solar System stable?
96
Fractals a geometry of nature
122
Fractals reflections and distortions
136
Chaos catastrophes and engineering
149
Chaos on the circuit board
162
Quantum physics on the edge of chaos
184
Chaos entropy and the arrow of time
203
Acknowledgements
224
Copyright

Clocks and chaos in chemistry
108

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