State and Society in the Philippines

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Rowman & Littlefield, Jan 1, 2005 - History - 353 pages
3 Reviews
People in the Philippines routinely vote, run for office, organize social movements, and call for good governance by the state. Why, then, is there a recurring state-society dilemma in the Philippines? One horn of the dilemma is the persistent inability of the state to provide basic services, guarantee peace and order, and foster economic development. The other is Filipinos' equally enduring suspicion of a strong state. The idea of a strong Republic evokes President Marcos' martial law regime of the 1970s and 1980s, which spawned two armed rebellions, cost thousands of lives in repression and billions of dollars in corruption, set the nation back years in economic development, and exacerbated suspicion of the state. This dilemma stimulates thinking about the puzzle of state resilience: How has a "weak state" maintained the territorial integrity of the Philippines in the postwar period in the face of two major rebellions and an armed separatist movement, corruption, mismanagement, intractable poverty, weak sovereignty, and an often chaotic electoral system? Why does the inability to collect taxes, secure citizens' lives and property, and maintain economic infrastructure not result in state failure? State and Society in the Philippines engages the dilemma of state-society relations through a historical treatment of state formation and the corresponding conflicts and collaborations between state leaders and social forces. It examines the long history of institutional state weakness in the Philippines and the efforts made to overcome the state's structural fragility and strengthen its bond with society. It answers these difficult questions by focusing on how the state has shaped and been shaped by its interaction with social forces, especially in the rituals of popular mobilization that have produced surprising and diverse results.
  

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Review: State and Society in the Philippines

User Review  - Ann Louise De Leon - Goodreads

This is my "Academic Bible". The first time I ever read this book was during my Political dynamics course in College. Now, I am using it in my History class and fortunately this is a required reading in my MAPS core course in UP Asian Center. Read full review

Review: State and Society in the Philippines

User Review  - Goodreads

This is my "Academic Bible". The first time I ever read this book was during my Political dynamics course in College. Now, I am using it in my History class and fortunately this is a required reading in my MAPS core course in UP Asian Center. Read full review

Contents

Introducing Philippine Politics
1
THE BOOKS APPROACH
3
CONCEPTUAL TOOLS
6
Social Forces
9
BASIC INFORMATION ABOUT THE PHILIPPINES
10
People and Practices
11
Political Administration and Political Power
12
Economic Realities
16
Crony Capitalism circa the 1920s
141
Restraining Politics
143
Popular Insurgency
147
THE COMMONWEALTH REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES
153
Social Changes on the Eve of World War II
157
WORLD WAR II AND THE SECOND REPUBLIC
159
All Politics Is Local 19461964
167
The End of Partyless Democracy
168

The Philippines in Maritime Asia to the Fourteenth Century
19
Localization and the Growth of Regional Networks
24
EARLY COMMUNITIES IN THE PHILIPPINE ARCHIPELAGO
27
A Web of Interdependence
28
TRADE TRIBUTE AND WARFARE IN A REGIONAL CONTEXT
31
Connections within and beyond the Archipelago
34
An Early Legal Document
37
NOTES
39
New States and Reorientations 13681764
41
Islam
42
Christianity
45
Conquest and Division
49
SOCIAL SPATIAL AND SPIRITUAL REDEFINITION
53
Reshaping the Economy to Pay for Colonization
60
Essential Outsiders
64
ORIGINS OF THE WEAK STATE
66
Territorial Stalemate
68
The British Occupation
70
State and Societies 17641898
75
THE NEW ECONOMY
76
The Importance of Land
80
REFORMING THE STATE
84
Provincial and Municipal Government
88
Education
92
Mapping the Peripheries
95
SOCIAL FORMATION AND STATE RESPONSE
96
Filipinos
98
Nation and States 18721913
102
Conflict within the Church
103
Struggle against Church and State
104
THE PHILIPPINE REVOLUTION AND THE FIRST REPUBLIC
109
The Malolos Republic
113
THE EARLY YEARS OF AMERICAN RULE
119
Parallel State Building in the Special Provinces
123
Conservative Nationalism
125
The Continuing Revolutionary Tradition
128
The Filipino Colonial State 19021946
134
FILIPINIZATION
139
A Fragile Economy
170
The Huk Rebellion
173
The Weak State
177
REFORMING THE STATE THROUGH ELECTORAL POLITICS
179
A Patchwork State
182
National Development
185
POSTWAR NATIONALISM
186
POSTWAR DEMOCRACY
189
Marcos 19651986
193
This Nation Can Be Great Again
194
Reform or Radical Change?
198
THE USMARCOS DICTATORSHIP
205
Decline
213
Resistance
216
Collapse
221
Democratization 19861998
230
Aquinos Legacy
231
Reformists and Trapos
237
ECONOMIC RECOVERY AND STATE REBUILDING
242
A Declaration of State Strength
244
DEMOCRATIZATION AND THE CHINESEFILIPINO COMMUNITY
253
THE UNRAVELING OF PHILIPPINES 2000
256
TwentyFirstCentury Philippine Politics
266
Movie Star Millenarianism
270
The Erap Presidency
273
Edsa 2 versus Edsa 3 Poor Peoples Power
277
DREAMING A STRONG REPUBLIC
278
Machine Politics versus Media Populism
282
Economic Governance
284
CURRENT ISSUES
290
Muslim Separatism
293
Population Policy
294
NOTES
302
Glossary
309
Bibliography
313
Index
335
About the Authors
353
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Patricio N. Abinales is professor in the School of Pacific and Asian Studies, the University of Hawai i at Manoa. Donna J. Amoroso (1960 2011) was visiting associate professor at the National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies, Tokyo, and editor of the Kyoto Review of Southeast Asia at the Center for Southeast Asian Studies, Kyoto University.

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