The London Medical and Physical Journal, Volume 58 (Google eBook)

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J. Souter, 1827
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Page 550 - Our attention was in this place arrested by a number of small birds, of different species, flying across the road and then back again, and turning and wheeling in manifold gyrations, and with much chirping, yet making no progress from the particular place over which they fluttered.
Page 247 - ... included in the incision, they do not do so with equal freedom, and there is some observable deformity. The length to which the perpendicular incisions at both angles ought to extend, must now be decided upon by the appearance of the part; they must be continued, if necessary, by repeated touches with the scissors, until that part of the eyelid containing the tarsal cartilage is perfectly free, and is evidently not acted upon by the fibres of the orbicularis muscle, which lie upon it. This frequently...
Page 278 - The result of their experiments is as follows : In bread every hundred pounds weight are found to contain eighty pounds of nutritious matter; butcher's meat, averaging the various sorts, contains only thirty-five pounds in one hundred ; French beans, (in the grain) ninety-two in one hundred, broad beans, eighty-nine ; peas, ninety-three ; lentiles, (a kind of half pea, but little known in...
Page 471 - To a graduate in physick, his due is about ten shillings, though he commonly expects or demands twenty. Those that are only licensed physicians, their due is no more than six shillings and eight pence, though they commonly demand ten shillings.
Page 378 - The Court of Examiners chosen and appointed by the Master, Wardens, and Assistants of the Society of Apothecaries, of the City of London, in pursuance of a certain Act of Parliament, 'For better Regulating the Practice of Apothecaries throughout England and Wales...
Page 278 - ... pounds of potatoes. The other substances bear the following proportions : four parts of cabbage to one of potatoes ; three parts of turnips to one...
Page 474 - Fellows. The Director (Mr. Frost) then delivered the annual oration, which he commenced by showing the advantages derivable from the extended sphere of the Society, and its use to the medical officers of the army and navy. He then pointed out the salutary effects that would accrue from the regulations relative to the study of botany by them, instituted by Sir James M'Grigor, Director-General of the Army Medical Board.
Page 549 - ... a cat-bird, which upon my approach flew up, and perched on a sapling two or three rods distant; at this instant a large black snake reared his head from the ground near the fence. I immediately stepped back a little, and sat down upon an eminence. The snake in a few...
Page 550 - Catskill, in company with a friend, and was- proceeding in a carriage by the river, along the road, which is there very narrow, with the water on one side, and, a steep bank, covered by bushes, on the other. His attention at that...
Page 547 - ... the hand ; it will be indifferent whether any partition be interposed between the cavity and the external air, as the water is equally well insulated by a surface of air as by a solid body. 2. The preceding experiments have shown that sounds immediately communicated to the closed meatus externus are very greatly augmented ; and it is an obvious inference, that if external sounds can be communicated so as to act .on the cavity in a similar manner, they must receive a corresponding augmentation....

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