Vocal Culture and Elocution: With Numerous Exercises in Reading and Speaking (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Wilson, Hinkle & Company, 1857 - Elocution - 470 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

The Cynic
113
Death of Morris
120
Industry and Eloquence
161
Awake to Effort
162
Cheerfulness
164
Varieties in Prose
165
Poetical Selections
167
Varieties in Prose
169
Personality of a Laugh
171
Do nt Run in Debt
173
No Excellence without La bor
174
Where theres a Will theres a Way
175
Varieties in Prose
176
Good Temper
178
Opposite Examples
179
Address to the Indolent
181
Varieties in Prose
182
Psalm of Life
184
Varieties in Prose
185
EXERCISE PAGE 67 What11 They Think
186
Paddle Your Own Canoe
187
Varieties in Prose
189
Poetical Selections
190
Varieties in Prose
192
Literary Pursuits
193
Opportunity for Effort
194
Suppose
195
The Spider and the Fly
196
Parallel between Pope and Dryden
197
Condition of Man Vindi cated
198
Advice to Preachers
200
Poetry of Science
201
Early rising conducive to Health
202
Oratory
203
Flowers
205
Inspiration of the Bible
207
Poetical Selections
208
Varieties in Prose
209
Suspense
211
Telescope and Microscope
212
The Unseen Battlefield
215
Varieties in Prose
216
God the Source of Conso lation
218
RELIGIOUS
219
Tell me ye Winged Winds 820
220
Survey of the Heavens
221
Defense of Pulpit Elo quence
222
Poetical Selections
225
Infidelity Tested
227
Religion the only Basis of Society
228
The Celestial Army
229
The Promises of Religion to the Young
231
Spirit of the American Revolution
233
On Reform in Parliament
235
Reply of Mr Pitt
236
American Laborers
238
Last Speech of Emmet
239
Against American War
241
Arbitrary Power not given to Man
242
Barbarity of National Hatreds
243
Varieties in Prose
245
Speech of Patrick Henry
247
Varieties in Prose
250
EXERCISE PAGE
251
Ignorance in our Coun
262
129
272
To the American Troops
288
Philip Van Artevelde
295
Antonys Oration over
301
Rollas Address to
307
EXERCISE PAGE 156 Woolseys Fall
325
The Rum Maniac
326
Battle Hymn
328
Brutus on the Death of Lucre la
329
Varieties in Verse
330
Othellos Apology
332
163 Hotspurs Description of a Fop
334
The Gamblers Wife
335
Cassius against Caesar
336
Rienzis Address to the Romans
338
The Sailor Boys Dream
339
Henry V at Harfleur
341
Parrhasius
342
The Seminoles Defiance
344
EXERCISE IV K 172 Love of Country
345
From Lalla Rookh
349
Varieties in Verse
361
Lochiels Warning 863
363
Song of the War
365
Charge of the Light Bri gade
366
Widow Bedott to Elder Sniffles
369
The LavinA Poem
371
Dr Bashaws Oration
374
The Directing Post
375
ParodyThe Old Oaken Bucket
376
Lyceum Speech of Mr Orator Climax
377
The Whiskers
378
Eloquence in a Western Court
381
Poetry Nowadays
382
Daniel versus Dishcloth
383
Housekeepers Soliloquy
386
The Rejected
387
The Confession
388
The Bachelors Soliloquy
389
The Frenchman and the Rats
390
Borrowed NailsHeads and Points
391
Fourth of July Oration
392
Mr John Smiths Will
393
Examination of a Wit ness
396
Mrs Caudles Lecture
397
Charge to the Jury
398
Truth in Parenthesis
399
The Modern Belle
400
Orator Puff
401
Nobodys Song
402
Coquette Punished
403
The Lost Pantaloons
405
Stump Speech
406
Parody on Hamlets Solil oquy
407
EXERCISE PAGE 220 Charge of a Dutch Mag istrate
408
The Nantucket Skipper
409
The Frog
410
The Hypochondriac
411
Buzfuz versus Pickwick
413
Socrates Snooks
416
Varieties in Verse
417
Fuss at Fires
419
Praying for Rain
420
The Dapple Mare
422
First Appearance in type
424
Love and Physic
425
Varieties in Verse
427
The Old Hat
429
The Three Black Crows
431
Charcooal
432
EXERCISE PAGE 237 All Tipsy but Me
433
Effects of Influenza
434
Bobadils Military Tac tics
435
Thanksgiving Dinner
437
The Mysterious Walker
441
Pleading Extraordinary
442
The Farmer and the Counselor
444
The Modest Wit
445
The March of Intellect
446
A Tea Party
447
There once was a Toper
449
Yes or No
450
Queries
451
Deacon Stokes
452
The Drunkards Resolu tion
454
The Old Arm Chair
455
Political Integrity
456
Who shall Judge a Man?
457
Highland Mary
458
The Rook and the Lark
459
The Old Man Dreams
460
The Sniveler
461
The Last Footfall
462
Varieties in Verse
463
The Isle of Long Ago
465
Llewellyn and his Dog
466
The Chambered Nautilus
467
The Power of Habit
468
E Pluribus Unum
470
The Union
471
Esto Perpetua
473
Lay of the Madman
474
Love Murder and Mat rimonyAlmost
476
The Miser and Plutus
477
Recollections
478
Little by Little
479
I m With You Once Again
480

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 115 - And there was mounting in hot haste: the steed, The mustering squadron, and the clattering car, Went pouring forward with impetuous speed, And swiftly forming in the ranks of war...
Page 59 - Whose howl's his watch, thus with his stealthy pace, With Tarquin's ravishing strides, towards his design Moves like a ghost. Thou sure and firm-set earth, Hear not my steps, which way they walk, for fear Thy very stones prate of my where-about, And take the present horror from the time, Which now suits with it.
Page 302 - tis his will : Let but the commons hear this testament, (Which, pardon me, I do not mean to read) And they would go and kiss dead Caesar's wounds, And dip their napkins in his sacred blood ; Yea, beg a hair of him for memory, And, dying, mention it within their wills, Bequeathing it, as a rich legacy, Unto their issue.
Page 249 - ... we mean not basely to abandon the noble struggle in which we have been so long engaged, and which we have pledged ourselves never to abandon until the glorious object of our contest shall be obtained, we must fight! I repeat it, sir, we must fight! An appeal to arms, and to the God of hosts, is all that is left us.
Page 41 - Here will I hold. If there's a power above us (And that there is, all Nature cries aloud Through all her works), he must delight in virtue ; And that which he delights in must be happy.
Page 468 - Through the deep caves of thought I hear a voice that sings: Build thee more stately mansions, O my soul, As the swift seasons roll! Leave thy low-vaulted past! Let each new temple, nobler than the last, Shut thee from heaven with a dome more vast, Till thou at length art free, Leaving thine outgrown shell by life's unresting sea!
Page 115 - Ah ! then and there was hurrying to and fro, And gathering tears, and tremblings of distress, And cheeks all pale, which but an hour ago Blushed at the praise of their own loveliness ; And there were sudden partings, such as press The life from out young hearts ; and choking sighs Which ne'er might be repeated...
Page 78 - THOU art, O God, the life and light Of all this wondrous world we see ; Its glow by day, its smile by night, Are but reflections caught from thee. Where'er we turn, thy glories shine, And all things fair and bright are thine.
Page 46 - Pride, our error lies; All quit their sphere, and rush into the skies. Pride still is aiming at the blest abodes, Men would be Angels, Angels would be Gods. Aspiring to be Gods, if Angels fell, Aspiring to be Angels, Men rebel: And who but wishes to invert the laws Of Order, sins against th
Page 337 - Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world, Like a Colossus ; and we petty men Walk under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. Men at some time are masters of their fates : The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, But in ourselves, that we are underlings.

Bibliographic information