Torah and Constitution: essays in American Jewish thought

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Syracuse University Press, 1998 - Religion - 222 pages
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In these essays, one of the most distinguished legal historians of the twentieth century, Milton R. Konvitz, analyzes the connections between the Torah and the American Constitution. For the academic and general reader alike, the pieces provide a synthesis of ideology of each culture's values.

In this work, which spans his entire career as an expert on the justice system, Konvitz combines the best of the Jewish and the liberal tradition. He analyzes topics that are vital to contemporary debate -- how fanaticism and blind religious zeal unanchored to informed historical tradition, lead to chaos. He elaborates on the centrality of law in both America and Judaism: the first bound to the Constitution and the Framers, the second bound to Revelation, expanding to a legal system fashioned and refashioned by human interpretation.

The author analyzes the intercorrelation of the Torah and the American Constitution; the Bill of Rights; the Declaration of Independence; the ideology of Thomas Jefferson; William James, John Dewey, Josiah Royce, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Herman Melville. His essays offer a readable synthesis of the the values and ideas of Judiasm and the values and ideas upon which American democracy was built.

Konvitz has long been considered a preeminent scholar on First Amendment rights, civil rights, and the law in America. These pieces, compiled here for the first time, gain new resonance as part of an ongoing theme -- the accord of American democracy and the Jewish religious tradition. Readers will find new understanding and further be challenged to new insights by this juxtaposition.

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Contents

The Jewish Quest for Equality and the American
3
If Profane Religion and Sacred Law I
55
S Law and Morals in the Bible Plato and Aristotle I
68
Copyright

6 other sections not shown

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About the author (1998)

Milton R. Konvitz is professor emeritus of law and professor emeritus of industrial and labor relations at Cornell University.

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