You Don't Have to Be Wrong for Me to Be Right: Finding Faith Without Fanaticism

Front Cover
Three Rivers Press, 2009 - Religion - 276 pages
16 Reviews
Conflict is an opportunity to learn and grow–and often to grow closer to one another.

Brad Hirschfield knows what it means to be a fanatic; he was one. A former activist in the West Bank, he was committed to reconstructing the Jewish state within its biblical borders. Now he is devoted to teaching inclusiveness, celebrating diversity, and delivering a message of acceptance. In You Don’t Have to Be Wrong for Me to Be Right, Rabbi Hirschfield uses his own spiritual journey to help people of all faiths find acceptance and tolerance, as well as a path to peace, understanding, and hope that will appeal to the common wisdom of all religions.
  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - JillKB - LibraryThing

When I bought this book, I joked that it would become my interfaith bible, and I think it has! I know that I will struggle with people (both friends and strangers) who I disagree with, but I have this ... Read full review

Review: You Don't Have to Be Wrong for Me to Be Right: Finding Faith Without Fanaticism

User Review  - Crystal - Goodreads

This is a great book about listening to one another, but I am afraid that it felt like he was preaching to the choir. The people likely to read the book are the ones that are already more likely to be ... Read full review

Contents

CHAPTER
15
CHAPTER
37
CHAPTER THREE
61
CHAPTER FOUR
81
CHAPTER
131
CHAPTER sEVEN
155
CHAPTER EIGHT
183
CHAPTER NINE
205
CHAPTER
227
Bibliography 2 49
249
Acknowledgments
255
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

RABBI BRAD HIRSCHFIELD is president of the National Jewish Center for Learning and Leadership and a popular commentator on religion and society. Recognized by Beliefnet.com as one of our leading preachers and teachers, his blog, Windows & Doors, reaches more than three million individuals every month. He also writes the weekly “On Faith” column for the Washington Post and has been recognized by Newsweek as one of America's ?fty most influential rabbis.

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