Lectures on Explosives: Prepared Especially as a Manual and Guide in the Laboratory of the U.S. Artillery School (Google eBook)

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Artillery School Press, 1891 - Explosives - 364 pages
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Page 191 - That proportion affords, therefore, security to guncotton against any destructive effects of the highest temperatures to which it is likely to be exposed, even under very exceptional climatic conditions. The only influences which the addition of that amount of carbonate to guncotton might exert upon its properties as an explosive would consist...
Page 179 - The steeping of the cotton in a fresh strong mixture of acids, after its first immersion and partial conversion into guncotton.
Page 262 - ... any conditions of storage, transport, or use, or when the material is subjected three times in succession to alternate freezing and thawing, or when subjected to the liquefaction test hereinbefore described.
Page 319 - Companies' option only under the following conditions: First. Shipments to be packed in strong boxes, not too large to be readily handled by one person, and each package to be plainly marked "Explosive," "Dangerous," on top and on one side or on one end.
Page 320 - In no case will percussion caps, exploders, safety squibs, fulminators, friction matches, or any other article of like nature be loaded in same car with any of the above explosives. There cannot be too great care exercised in this matter.
Page 247 - By the absorption of the nitro-glycerine in some porous substance, it acquires the property of being in a high degree insensible to shocks, and it can also be burned over fire without exploding.
Page 319 - Nitrate or other explosive preparations not in accordance with above specifications (except ordinary black powder) will in no case be received for shipment. FOURTH. Shipments must be so loaded that boxes will lie bottom side down, it being understood that the cartridges are so placed in the boxes that they will lie on their sides and never on their ends when so loaded. The boxes must be so placed In car that they cannot fall to the floor under any circumstances. FIFTH. -Shipments of common black...
Page 349 - ... those vibrations, either determine the explosion of that substance, or at any rate greatly aid the disturbing effect of mechanical force suddenly applied, while, in the instance of another explosion, which...
Page 319 - Shipments must be so loaded that boxes will lie bottom side down, it being understood that the cartridges are so placed in the boxes that they will lie on their sides and never on their ends when so loaded. The boxes must be so placed in car that they cannot fall to the floor under any circumstances. Fifth. Shipments of common black powder may be received if packed in good, substantial iron or...
Page 69 - Is a very intimate mixture of potassium nitrate (nitre), sulphur and charcoal, which do not act upon each other at the ordinary temperature, but when heated together, arrange themselves into new forms, evolving a very large amount of highly heated gas. These three ingredients may be mixed in greatly varying proportions, each mixture being explosive, but there must be evidently some particular proportions which will produce the most effective powder.

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