Hindu Castes and Sects: An Exposition of the Origin of the Hindu Caste System and the Bearing of the Sects Towards Each Other and Towards Other Religious Systems (Google eBook)

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Thacker, Spink, 1896 - Caste - 623 pages
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Contents

India
97
PART V
109
PART VI
118
The Barna Brahmans 125126
125
PART VII
132
The Rajputs 13213
138
TheJata 145146
145
The Maravans Ahanidians and Etallans 153154
153
The Scientific Castes
159
CHAPTER PAOB III The Kayasthas of Upper India 186191
160
The Bez of Assam 172
172
The Kayasthas of Bengal 178185
178
The Srivatsa Kayaathas 186188
186
The Ambaatha Kayasthaa
188
The Sakya Seni Kayaathas 189190
189
The Kula Sreahti Kayaathas
190
The Balmiki Kayaathas
191
The Writer Castes of Southern India 192193
192
The Prabhus of the Bombay Presidency 194
194
The Kolitas of Assam 196197
196
PART X
198
The Suvarua Baniks of Bengal 199201
199
The Gandha Baniks of Bengal 201202
201
The Baniyas of Northern India 203217
203
The Agarwals 205207
205
The Oasawala 207209
207
The Khandelwala 209210
209
The Srimali Baniyaa
210
The Porawal Baniyas
211
The Agrahari Baniyas
212
The Raatogis
213
The Lohiya Baniyas
214
CHArTBR PAG 19 The Baranwals
215
TheMahuris
216
TheRaoniyars 21621
217
The Baniyas of Gujrat
218
The Trading Castes of Southern India 219
219
The MercantileCastes of theTelegu Country 221
221
The Baniyas of Orissa
223
PART XI
224
The Weavers 227236
227
The Tantis of Bengal 230232
230
The Tatwas of Behar 232233
232
The Kori and Koli of Upper India
233
The Weavers of the Dravira Country
234
The Weavers of theTelegu Country
236
The Sweetmeatmaking Castes 237239
237
The Kumar or Potter
240
The Ironsmiths 241243
241
The Goldsmiths 244245
244
The Patichanam Varlu of the Telogu Country and the Kammallars of Dravira
245
CHAPTER PACK
246
The Dirjis or Tailors
253
The Oil Manufacturers 262264
262
The Matmakers and Basketmakers
269
PART XIII
270
The Agricultural Castes of Mysore
287
The Agricultural Castes of the Dravira Country 288290
288
The Pangrowers 291293
291
TheTambuli 292293
292
PART XIV
294
The Abhirs or Ahirs 296
296
The Gujars 298
298
The Goalas of the Lower Provinces 300302
300
The Cowherds of Southern India
304
The Shepherd Castes
305
PART XV
306
The Washermen
308
The Castes usually employed as Domestic Servants in Hindu Households
309
The Castes of the Domestic Servants in AngloIndian Households 313314
313
PART XVI
315
The Criminal Tribes
317
HINDU SECTS PART I
319
IT The Evolution of the Theocratic Art
325
Classification of Religions
336
Definitions of Religion
339
The True Origin of Religion
342
Religion as a Foundation of Ethics
345
General Observations about the Sect Founders
350
The Inducements held out by Sect Founders to attract Followers
353
The Methods of Priestly Operations
355
General Character of the Hindu Sects
359
Classification of the Sects
364
The Mode of ascertaining the sect to which a Hindu Monk belongs
366
PART II
367
Probable Origin of the Sivite Religion
370
The Sivite Followers of Sankara
374
The Dandis
380
Tho Sanyasis
382
The Parama Kansas
386
The Brahmacharis
388
The Householder Sanyasis
390
The Aghoris
391
The Lingaits of Southern India
395
The Sivite Yogis
399
The Inferior Yogis
403
The Sects that practise severe Austerities
405
chapthr pack
407
PART IV
414
The Herogod Krishna as a Historical
423
Krishna as the God of the modern Vishnuvite
431
The Madhavacharis
440
Other Ramworshipping Sects
446
The Chaitanite Sect of Bengal
459
The Swami Narain Sect of Gujrat
472
The Mahapurushia Sect of Assam
478
The Disreputable Vishnuvite Sects of Upper
484
PART VI
495
Condition
510
Personal History of Buddha
517
The Jains
548
The Brahmans of Gujrat 7381
581

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 326 - But with theology the case is very different. As respects natural religion, revelation being for the present altogether left out of the question, it is not easy to see that a philosopher of the present day is more favourably situated than Thales or Simonides. He has before him just the same evidences of design in the structure of the universe which the early Greeks had.
Page 17 - A. KINLOCH. Containing Descriptions of the Country and of the various Animals to be found; together with Extracts from a journal of several years
Page 525 - There are two extremes, O Bhikkhus, which he who has given up the world, ought to avoid. What are these two extremes ? A life given to pleasures, devoted to pleasures and lusts : this is degrading, sensual, vulgar, ignoble, and profitless ; and a life given to mortifications : this is painful, ignoble, and profitless.
Page 167 - But men have attempted to prove that I have been guided by my own imagination, reason, and intellect. Under this conviction they have from time to time protested against my proceedings. They should remember that to protest against the cause I uphold is to protest against the dispensations of God Almighty, the God of all Truth and Holiness.
Page 20 - Work of the National Association for Supplying Female Medical Aid to the Women of India.
Page vi - It often happens that the universal belief of one age of mankind a belief from which no one was, nor without an extraordinary effort of genius and courage, could at that time be free becomes to a subsequent age so palpable an absurdity, that the only difficulty then is to imagine how such a thing can ever have appeared credible.
Page 524 - The Tathagata, O Bhikkhus, is the holy, absolute Sambuddha. Give ear, O Bhikkhus! The immortal (Amata) has been won (by me) ; I will teach you ; to you I preach the doctrine. If you walk in the way I show you, you will, ere long, have penetrated to the truth, having yourselves known it and seen it face to face ; and you will live in the possession of that highest goal of the holy life, for the sake of which noble youths fully give up the world and go forth into the houseless state.
Page 116 - Rajpoot robbers, when he sees the latter approach, warns them off by holding a dagger in his hand, and if they do not attend to him, he stabs himself in a place that is not mortal, and taking the blood from the wound, throws it at the assailants with imprecations of future woe and ruin. If this has not the desired effect, the wounds are repeated ; and in extreme cases one of the Charun's relations, commonly a female child, or an old woman, is made a sacrifice.
Page 8 - One can readily imagine the merriment created round the camp fire by the recitation of 'The Two Thumpers,
Page 386 - S'aiva sect. Their essential characteristic is the wearing of the Linga emblem on some part of their dress or person. The Paramahansas are ascetics who pretend to be solely occupied with the investigation of Brahman, and to be equally indifferent to pleasure or pain, insensible of heat or cold, and incapable of satiety or want.

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