The Faerie Queene, Book Two (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Hackett Publishing, 2006 - History - 288 pages
41 Reviews
From its opening scenes--in which the hero refrains from fighting a duel, then discovers that his horse has been stolenóBook Two of The Faerie Queene redefines the nature of heroism and of chivalry. Its hero is Sir Guyon, the knight of Temperance, whose challenges frequently take the form of temptations. Accompanied by a holy Palmer in place of a squire, Guyon struggles to subdue himself as well as his enemies.  His adventures lead up to a climactic encounter with the arch-temptress Acrasia in her Bower of Bliss, which provides the occasion for some of Spenser's most sensuous verse. With its mixture of chivalric romance, history, and moral allegory, Book Two succeeds in presenting an exuberant exploration of the virtue of self-restraint.
  

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Review: The Faerie Queene, Book Two (The Faerie Queene Books #2)

User Review  - Matt - Goodreads

While not as good as Book One, Book Two still is full of lovely, vivid imagery like only Spenser can versify! Read full review

Review: The Faerie Queene, Book One (The Faerie Queene Books #1)

User Review  - Matt - Goodreads

The Red Cross Knight is my favorite part of The Faerie Queene so far. Excellent story, excellent imagery, from the undeniable KING of the English epic. It's not wonder even Shakespeare was inspired by Spenser. The man was the boss. Read full review

Contents

Dedication
2
Proem
3
Canto One
5
Canto Two
24
Canto Three
39
Canto Four
54
Canto Five
69
Canto Six
82
Canto Ten
157
Canto Eleven
182
Canto Twelve
197
The Letter to Raleigh
225
The Life of Edmund Spenser
229
Textual Notes
232
Glossary
236
Index of Characters
239

Canto Seven
98
Canto Eight
119
Canto Nine
137

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Page xxv - ... our sage and serious poet Spenser, whom I dare be known to think a better teacher than Scotus or Aquinas...
Page xxvii - Half-hidden, like a mermaid in seaweed, Pensive awhile she dreams awake, and sees In fancy, fair St. Agnes in her bed, But dares not look behind, or all the charm is fled.
Page xxvi - In the afternoon they came unto a land In which it seemed always afternoon. All round the coast the languid air did swoon, Breathing like one that hath a, weary dream. Full-faced above the valley stood the moon ; And like a downward smoke, the slender stream Along the cliff to fall and pause and fall did seem. A land of streams ! some, like a downward smoke, Slow-dropping veils of thinnest lawn, did go; And some thro' wavering lights and shadows broke, Rolling a slumbrous sheet of foam below.

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About the author (2006)

Spenser's admiration for Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales purposely gives an archaic language to his epic poetry of Christian virtues and mythology of King Arthur.

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