General Relativity: An Introduction for Physicists (Google eBook)

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Cambridge University Press, Feb 2, 2006 - Science
5 Reviews
General Relativity: An Introduction for Physicists provides a clear mathematical introduction to Einstein's theory of general relativity. It presents a wide range of applications of the theory, concentrating on its physical consequences. After reviewing the basic concepts, the authors present a clear and intuitive discussion of the mathematical background, including the necessary tools of tensor calculus and differential geometry. These tools are then used to develop the topic of special relativity and to discuss electromagnetism in Minkowski spacetime. Gravitation as spacetime curvature is then introduced and the field equations of general relativity derived. After applying the theory to a wide range of physical situations, the book concludes with a brief discussion of classical field theory and the derivation of general relativity from a variational principle. Written for advanced undergraduate and graduate students, this approachable textbook contains over 300 exercises to illuminate and extend the discussion in the text.
  

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这本书不错, 很大篇幅在宇宙学应用上, 很基本, 公式也很全!

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
12
Section 2
26
Section 3
53
Section 4
92
Section 5
111
Section 6
135
Section 7
147
Section 8
150
Section 13
273
Section 14
288
Section 15
310
Section 16
346
Section 17
347
Section 18
355
Section 19
386
Section 20
428

Section 9
176
Section 10
196
Section 11
230
Section 12
248
Section 21
441
Section 22
467
Section 23
498
Section 24
524

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Page 23 - For if the magnet is in motion and the conductor at rest, there arises in the neighbourhood of the magnet an electric field with a certain definite energy, producing a current at the places where parts of the conductor are situated. But if the magnet is stationary and the conductor in motion, no electric field arises in the neighbourhood of the magnet. In the conductor, however, we find an electromotive force, to which in itself there is no corresponding energy, but which gives rise — assuming...
Page 23 - ... draws a sharp distinction between the two cases in which either the one or the other of these bodies is in motion. For if the magnet is in motion and the conductor at rest, there arises in the neighborhood of the magnet an electric field with a certain definite energy, producing a current at the places where parts of the conductor are situated. But if the magnet is stationary and the conductor in motion, no electric field arises in the neighborhood of the magnet. In the conductor, however...
Page 23 - It is known that Maxwell's electrodynamics — as usually understood at the present time — when applied to moving bodies, leads to assymmetries which do not appear to be inherent in the phenomena. Take for example the reciprocal electrodynamic action of a magnet and a conductor. The observable phenomenon here depends only on the relative motion of the conductor and the magnet ; whereas the customary view draws a sharp distinction...

About the author (2006)

Michael Hobson is a Reader in Astrophysics and Cosmology at the Cavendish Laboratory. He is also Director of Natural Sciences at Trinity Hall, Cambridge.

George Efstathiou is Director of the Institute of Astronomy, the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of the Royal Society.

Anthony Lasenby is Professor of Astrophysics and Cosmology and Head of both the Astrophysics Group and the Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory at the University of Cambridge.

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