Moral Physiology, Or A Brief and Plain Treatise on the Population Question (Google eBook)

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Watson, 1842 - 48 pages
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Page 13 - Though most unworthy of the name. A letter forged ! Saint Jude to speed ! Did ever knight so foul a deed ! At first in heart it liked me ill, When the king praised his clerkly skill. Thanks to Saint Bothan, son of mine, Save Gawain, ne'er could pen a line : So swore I, and I swear it still, Let my boy-bishop fret his fill. Saint Mary mend my fiery mood ! Old age ne'er cools the Douglas blood, I thought to slay him where he stood. 'Tis pity of him too...
Page 21 - And so long, I would add, will mankind (wise and successful whenever there is question of improving the animal races) be blind in perceiving, and listless in securing, that far nobler object, the physical, and thereby (in a measure) the mental and moral improvement of our own. I may...
Page 25 - But our flower was in flushing, When blighting was nearest. Fleet foot on the correi, Sage counsel in cumber, Red hand in the foray, How sound is thy slumber ! Like the dew on the mountain, Like the foam on the river, Like the bubble on the fountain, Thou art gone, and for ever ! XVII.
Page 5 - The magistrates of the place, eager to evince their loyalty toward their new queen, presented her, on her arrival with a sample of those commodities for which alone their town was remarkable. The major-domo, who conducted the princess, received the gloves very graciously ; but, when the stockings were presented, he flung them away with great indignation, and severely reprimanded the magistrates for this egregious piece of indecency. " Know," said he, " that a queen of Spain has no legs.
Page 20 - Is it not notorious, that the families of the married often increase beyond what a regard for the young beings coming into the world, or the happiness of those who give them birth, would dictate? In how many instances does the hard-working father, and more especially the mother of a poor family, remain slaves throughout their lives, tugging at the oar of incessant labour, toiling to live, and living only to die; when, if their offspring had been limited to two or three only, they might have enjoyed...
Page 15 - ... reform, and if we assume the present population of the world at one thousand millions, we shall find the rate of increase as follows : At the end of 100 years there will be 8,000 millions. " " 200 " " 64,000 " " " 300 " 512,000 " " " 400 " " 4,096,000 " " " 500 " 32,768,000 And so on, multiplying by 8 for every additional hundred years.
Page 10 - ... and bless human nature. Its very power, indeed, gives fatal force to its aberrations; even as the waters of the calmest river, when dammed up or forced from their bed, flood and ruin the...
Page 24 - If the moral feelings were carefully cultivated, if we were taught to consult, in every thing, rather the welfare of those we love than our own, how strongly would these arguments be felt! No man ought even to desire that a woman should become the mother of his children, unless it was her express wish, and unless he knew it to be for her welfare, that she should. Her feelings, her interests, should be for him in this matter an imperative law. She it is who bears the burden, and therefore with her...
Page 24 - ... would these arguments be felt! No man ought even to desire that a woman should become the mother of his children, unless it was her express wish, and unless he knew it to be for her welfare, that she should. Her feelings, her interests, should be for him in this matter an imperative law. She it is who bears the burden, and therefore with her also should the decision rest. Surely it may well be a question whether it be desirable, or whether any man ought to ask, that the whole life of an intellectual,...
Page 9 - ULIhappy victims, whom the brutal, yet tolerated vices of man, ami their own unsuspicious or ucgovevned feelings, betray to misery and degradation. He never sought the company but of the intellectual and self-respecting of the other sex, and has no associations connected with the name of woman, but those of esteem and respectful affection. To this day, he is even girlishly sensitive to the coarse and ribald jests in which young men think it witty to indulge, at the expense of a sex they cannot appreciate....

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