The debate between pride and lowliness, Volume 10 (Google eBook)

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Printed for the Shakespeare society, 1841 - 87 pages
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Page 33 - That could infourme us of the right uppon A matter here before us come to controversed. Here is none learned, but if I be one ; And somewhat of the matter him rehersed. He aunswered, that his experience Was better then his learning a great deale, Namely in the statutes of penitence ; For in these, and none others doth he deale. Then was there yet another whom I see, Which stoode one of the hindmost of the route, For soft, and no whit forthputting was hee ; Full sunbrunt was his forehead and his snoute....
Page 19 - A faire blacke coate of cloth withouten sieve, And buttoned the shoulder round about ; Of xx1 a yard, as I beleeve, And layd upon with parchment lace without. His dublet was of sattin very fine, And it was cut and stitched very thick : Of silke it had a costly enterlyne ; His shirt had bands and ruffe of pure cambrick. His upper stockes of sylken grogerane, And to his hippes they...
Page 67 - For who so shal esteeme his labour lost, That shal it reade, he may think therewithal, I lost more manifold, both paine and cost, Yet never greeved me ne never shal. For while I wrote this I dyd nothyng els, Save that I kept [my] mynd from idlenesse, The cause of harlottry, as Ovid tels : So wyl it them that read it, as I gesse, Better, I wys, then Amadis de Gaule, Or els the Pallas forced with Pleasure, Who though they promise honny yelden gale, And unto coales do turne theyr fained treasure. Or...
Page xvi - ... (Quip. Sign. C 2.) Afterwards Thynn tells us that the tailor will charge his customers dearly, " ' And reache them with a bill of reekening Shal make them scrat wheras it itcheth nought ' and Greene adopts the humorous phrase : ' and yet to overreach my yoong maister with a bill of reckonings that will make him scratch where it itcheth not.' (Quip. Sign. C 2.) The point of plagiarism may therefore be considered established, and need be pursued no farther." Bridgewater Catalogue. 4to....
Page 86 - Though wormes have eat," &c. Page 25, line 5. " But I nyl'stay," ie But I ne wyl, or will not, stay. Page 33, line 21. " Startups," from this description, were obviously very much like the lacing-boots or highlows still worn by peasants. They are mentioned in Middleton's " Family of Love," and by many other authorities. Cotgrave explains guestres as " startups, high shoes, or gamashes for country folks.
Page vi - Debate,' and it is doubtful if Greene, even in that day, knew who was the writer of it. That the offence Greene had committed, in this respect, was not discovered at the time, we have this evidence : Greene and Gabriel Harvey were bitter enemies : the latter brought all sorts of charges against the former for calling him the son of a rope-maker, in the 'Quip for an Upstart Courtier'; and, if Harvey (a man extremely well versed in contemporary literature) had been aware of the fact that Greene's...
Page 19 - And to his hippes they sate full close and trym, And laced very costly every pane : Their lyning was of satten, as I wyn. " ' His neather stockes of silke accordingly ; A velvet gyrdle rounde about his wast. This knight or squyre, what so he be (quoth I) We wyll empannell : let him not goe past. " ' He condiscended soone to our request. Then I, beholding him advisedly, Sawe where a needle sticked on his brest, And at the same a blacke threed hanging by.' " ' Coming more neere indeed (says Greene)...
Page 4 - If other matter it may yeelden thee. As morall counsel, whereby thou may lerne What thinges are good to folowe, what to flee, Then thanke me when we meeten at the terme. And pray God blesae our Queene and Countrey, And graunt her long to raigue and prosperous; And to as all after this journey In heaven with him selfe a dwelling house.
Page xiii - ... (Quip. 1592. Sign. B 3). However, Velvet-breeches ultimately consents, on condition that his right of challenge, as well as that of Cloth-breeches, is allowed. The following is the description of a tailor, the first juryman, after we have been told that ' piked he was, and handsome in his weede.
Page 16 - For proofe that he hath done ye disseason, To alledge what so ye can bethinke ye, And therein at our handes to aske for reason. He answerd, to be plentiffe in thassise He thought not good, ne ment not so to be, And that it was not good I dyd advise : A jury may be perciall (quoth he) For I am woorthyer by much then he, For many causes that I can alledge ; But yf they wyll seeme suche to the countrie, I doubt, or of them yf they wyl take knowledge. For I am here a straunger in this lande, And save...

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