Inferno: The Firebombing of Japan, March 9-August 15, 1945

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Edwin Palmer Hoyt
Madison Books, Jan 1, 2000 - History - 153 pages
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"Targeting Tokyo, Nagoya, Osaka, and Kobe, as well as smaller Japanese cities, Major General Curtis LeMay (1906-1990) and his squadrons of B-29 bombers - flying low and carrying nothing but incendiary explosives - unleashed an almost nightly bombing campaign througout the spring and summer of 1945 that reduced the residential and commercial centers of the nation to rubble and charcoal. Fueled by high winds and napalm, these bombs proved frighteningly effective against the island's traditional wood and paper houses, killing 300,000 men, women, and children, and wounding 500,000 more." "During the first raid on Tokyo on March 9, 1945, the resulting firestorm burned nearly sixteen square miles of the city and sent its terrified residents running through the streets in search of shelter. The survivors overcame flames, panicked crowds, falling debris, and choking smoke. Many fled to the city's rivers, where they drowned. With penicillin in short supply, disease ran rampant. In all, 100,000 Japanese civilians perished." "Based on vivid interviews with dozens of survivors, Inferno is an unflinching, intimate account of those horrific events as they unfolded in the midnight hours of a desperate world war. It is also an indictment of the decisions and decision-makers who refocused strategy in the Pacific Theater from military targets to innocent civilians."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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Contents

B25s to B29s
1
Firestorm
7
To Burn Up Japan
37
Copyright

16 other sections not shown

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About the author (2000)

Edwin P. Hoyt, a former soldier, is a distinguished historian in the field of World War II studies, and the author of Japan's War, The GI's War, and Hitler's War. He lives in Tokyo, Japan.

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