Shadows of the Mind: A Search for the Missing Science of Consciousness

Front Cover
Vintage, 1995 - Artificial intelligence - 457 pages
20 Reviews
Penrose contends that some aspects of the human mind lie beyond computation. This is not a religious argument (that the mind is something other than physical) nor is it based on the brain's vast complexity (the weather is immensely complex, says Penrose, but it is still a computable thing, at least in theory). Instead, he provides powerful arguments to support his conclusion that there is something in the conscious activity of the brain that transcends computation - and will find no explanation in terms of present-day science. To illuminate what he believes this "something" might be, and to suggest where a new physics must proceed so that we may understand it, Penrose cuts a wide swathe through modern science, providing penetrating looks at everything from Turing computability and Godel's incompleteness, via Schrodinger's Cat and the Elitzur-Vaidman bomb-testing problem, to detailed microbiology.

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Review: Shadows of the Mind: A Search for the Missing Science of Consciousness

User Review  - Alex - Goodreads

First and foremost Penrose presents the best argument against computer-simulated human intelligence I've heard to date. In fact it is the only argument that I know of that holds water (and I think by ... Read full review

Review: Shadows of the Mind: A Search for the Missing Science of Consciousness

User Review  - Unnikrishnan Rajan - Goodreads

This was my introductory book to Roger Penrose. But the book was very intimidating, even for a computer science graduate. Only consolation was that exploration of the high level concepts of Turing ... Read full review

About the author (1995)

Professor Sir Roger Penrose is Emeritus Rouse Ball Professor of Mathematics at the University of Oxford. He has received a number of prizes and awards, including the 1988 Wolf Prize for physics which he shared with Stephen Hawking for their joint contribution to our understanding of the universe.

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