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Books Books 1 - 10 of 142 on ... of Trent, though no man can deny but that theirs is the purer English Saxon at....  
" ... of Trent, though no man can deny but that theirs is the purer English Saxon at this day, yet it is not so Courtly nor so... "
principles of english etymology - Page 499
by rev. walter w. skeat - 1887
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Ancient critical essays upon English poets and poŽsy, Volume 1

George Gascoigne, William Webbe, James I (King of England), Sir John Harington, Francis Meres, Thomas Campion, Samuel Daniel, Edmund Bolton, Edmund Spenser, Gabriel Harvey - English literature - 1811
...so currant as our Southerne English is, no more is the far Westerne mas speach : ye shall therfore take the vsuall speach of the Court, and that of London...and not much aboue. I say not this but that in euery sbyre of England there be gentlemen and others that speake but specially write as good Southerne as...
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Ancient critical essays upon English poets and poŽsy, Volume 1

Joseph Haslewood, George Gascoigne, William Webbe, James I (King of England), Sir John Harington, Francis Meres, Thomas Campion, Samuel Daniel, Edmund Bolton, Edmund Spenser, Gabriel Harvey - English literature - 1811
...so currant as our Southerne English is, no more is the far Westerne mas speach : ye shall therfore take the vsuall speach of the Court, and that of London...myles, and not much aboue. I say not this but that in eueryshyre of England there be gentlemen and others that speake but specially write as good Southerne...
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Blackwood's Magazine, Volume 102

History - 1867
...Southern English is ; no more is the far Western man's speech. Ye shall, therefore, take the usual speech of the Court, and that of London, and the shires lying about London, within sixty miles and not much above." All our greatest writers from the days of Shakespeare to our own have,...
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Memoirs of the Court of Queen Elizabeth ...

Lucy Aikin - Great Britain - 1818
...Southern English is ; no more is the far Western man's speech : ye shall therefore take the usual speech of the court and that of London and the shires lying about London within sixty miles and not much above. I say not this but in every shire of England there be gentlemen and...
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The History of English Poetry,: From the Close of the Eleventh to ..., Volume 4

Thomas Warton - English poetry - 1824
...daily talke, whether they be noblemen or gentlemen, or of their best clarkes, all is a matter, &c. Ye shall therefore take the vsuall speach of the court, and that of -London, and the shires lying abovt London within Ix myles, and not mvch aboue. I say not this, bvt that in euery shyre of England...
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The history of English poetry. To which are prefixed, three dissertations ...

Thomas Warton - History - 1840
...daily talke, whether they be noblemen or gentlemen, or of their best clarkes, all is a matter, &c. Ye shall therefore take the vsuall speach of the court, and that of London, and the shires lying abovt London within Ix myles, and not ravch aboue. I say not this, bvt that in euery shyre of England...
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The history of English poetry: from the close of the eleventh century to the ...

Thomas Warton - Literary Criticism - 1840
...daily talke, whether they be noblemen or gentlemen, or of their best clarkes, all is a matter, &c. Ye shall therefore take the vsuall speach of the court, and that of London, and the shires lying abovt London within Ix myles, and not mvch aboue. I say not this, bvt that in euery shyre of England...
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The Living Age ..., Volume 95

1867
...Southern English is ; no more is the far Western man's speech. Ye shall, therefore, take the usual speech of the Court, and that of London, and the shires lying about London, within sixty miles, and not much above." All our greatest writers from the days of Shakspeare to our own....
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An Introduction to English Antiquities: Intended as a Companion to the ...

James Eccleston - England - 1847 - 485 pages
...after similar lamentations, lays down as the correct rule for speech or writing, "the usual speech of the court, and that of London, and the shires lying about London within sixty miles, and not much above." 7. In spite of these well meant efforts, however, a singular affectation,...
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The Social History of the People of the Southern Counties of England in Past ...

George Roberts - England - 1856 - 572 pages
...Puttenham, in his " Art of Poesie," lays down as the correct rule for speech or writing, " The usual speech of the Court and that of London, and the shires lying about London within sixty miles, and not much above." The knights of Cornwall, in the reign of Edward II., claimed their...
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