Men and measures of half a century: sketches and comments (Google eBook)

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C. Scribner's Sons, 1888 - United States - 542 pages
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Page 323 - I have had no communication with General Grant for more than a week. He left his command without my authority, and went to Nashville. His army seems to be as much demoralized by the victory of Fort Donelson as was that of the Potomac by the defeat of Bull Run. It is hard to censure a successful general immediately after a victory, but I think he richly deserves it. I can get no returns, no reports, no information of any kind from him. Satisfied with his victory, he sits down and enjoys it, without...
Page 383 - In my judgment, the freedmen, if they show patience and manly virtues, will sooner obtain a participation in the elective franchise through the States than through the general government, even if it had power to intervene.
Page 383 - So fixed was this reservation of power in the habits of the people and so unquestioned has been the interpretation of the Constitution that during the civil war the late President never harbored the purpose certainly never avowed...
Page 314 - By direction of the President of the United States, it is ordered that Major-General McClellan be relieved from the command of the Army of the Potomac, and that Major-General Burnside take the command of that army.
Page 499 - States are expressly prohibited from making any thing but gold and silver a tender in payment of debts ; and although no such express prohibition is applied to Congress, yet, as Congress has no power granted to it in this respect but to coin money and...
Page 383 - Such an act would have created a new class of voters, and would have been an assumption of power by the President which nothing in the Constitution or laws of the "United States would have warranted. " On the other hand, every danger of conflict is avoided when the settlement of the question is referred to the several States. They can, each for itself, decide on the measure, and whether it is to be adopted at once and absolutely, or introduced gradually and with conditions.
Page 321 - Yours of this date, proposing armistice and appointment of Commissioners to settle terms of capitulation, is just received. No terms except an unconditional and immediate surrender can be accepted. I propose to move immediately upon your works.
Page 499 - Most unquestionably there is no legal tender, and there can be no legal tender, in this country, under the authority of this government or any other, but gold and silver, either the coinage of our own mints, or foreign coins, at rates regulated by Congress. This is a constitutional principle perfectly plain, and of the very highest importance.
Page 399 - The people have not heard the evidence as we have heard it. The responsibility is not on them but upon us. They have not taken an oath ' to do impartial justice according to the Constitution and the laws.
Page 385 - ... so precarious. With the destruction of the monopoly, free labor will hasten from all parts of the civilized world to assist in developing various and immeasurable resources which have hitherto lain dormant. The eight or nine States nearest the Gulf of Mexico have a soil of exuberant fertility, a climate friendly to long life, and can sustain a denser population than is found as yet in any part of our country.

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