Quantum Electrodynamics (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Westview Press, Mar 1, 1998 - Science - 208 pages
4 Reviews
This classic work presents the main results and calculational procedures of quantum electrodynamics in a simple and straightforward way. Designed for the student of experimental physics who does not intend to take more advanced graduate courses in theoretical physics, the material consists of notes on the third of a three-semester course given at the California Institute of Technology.
  

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Kuantum mekaniği ve elektrodinamiğini işin ustasından ğrenmek iin...

Contents

Interaction of Light with MatterQuantum Electrodynamics
3
Resume of the Principles and Results of Special Relativity
23
Rebtivistic Wave Equation
34
Solution of the Dirac Equation for a Free Particle
56
Potential Problems in Quantum Electrodynamics
71
Relativistic Treatment of the Interaction of Particles with Light
91
Interaction of Several Electron
118
Discussion and Interpretation of Various Correction Terms
128
Pauli Principle and the Dirac Equation
162
Reprints
178
Copyright

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Page 168 - B from which it results. For some purposes the specification in terms of K is easier to use and visualize. We desire eventually to discuss quantum electrodynamics from this point of view. To gain a greater familiarity with the K function and the point of view it suggests, we consider a simple perturbation problem. Imagine we have a particle in a weak potential I/(x, I), a function of position and time.
Page 167 - ... time (positron scattering) or forward (pair production). For such a particle the amplitude for transition from an initial to a final state is analyzed to any order in the potential by considering it to undergo a sequence of such scatterings. The amplitude for a process involving many such particles is the product of the transition amplitudes for each particle. The exclusion principle requires that antisymmetric combinations of amplitudes be chosen for those complete processes which differ only...
Page 171 - The fact that the entire sum is taken as negative in computing X+(4, 3) is reflected in the fact that in hole theory the amplitude has its sign reversed in accordance with the Pauli principle and the fact that the electron arriving at 2 has been exchanged with one in the sea.

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About the author (1998)

Richard P. Feynmanwas raised in Far Rockaway, New York, and received his Ph.D. from Princeton. He held professorships at both Cornell and the California Institute of Technology. In 1965 he received the Nobel Prize for his work on quantum electrodynamics. He died in 1988.

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